Psychology Upper-Division Courses

100A. Psychological Statistics. (4) Lecture, four hours. Requisites: course 10 with a grade of C or better, and one course from Mathematics 2, Program in Computing 10A, Statistics 10, or one term of calculus. Designed for premajors. Basic statistical procedures and their application to research and practice in various areas of psychology. Letter grading.

100B. Research Methods in Psychology. (6) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10 and 100A, with grades of C or better. Introduction to research methods and critical analysis in psychology. Lecture and laboratory topics include experimental and nonexperimental research methods, statistical design and analysis as applied to a broad range of basic and applied research issues. P/NP or letter grading.

101. General Psychology Laboratory. (4) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, 100B. General laboratory course for psychology students to acquire key concepts in psychology through active participation in enriched environment. Use of current technologies (e.g., Web-based teaching, interactive computer demonstrations) in challenging atmosphere to learn how mind works. Letter grading.

M107. Asian American Personality and Mental Health. (4) (Same as Asian American Studies M117.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 10. Foundations of personality development and mental health among Asian Americans. Topics include culture, family patterns, achievements, stressors, resources, and immigrant and minority group status. P/NP or letter grading.

110. Fundamentals of Learning. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Designed for juniors/seniors. Experimental findings on animal and human conditioning; retention and transfer of training; relation of learning and motivation. Intended to provide empirical basis for theory and research in this area. P/NP or letter grading.

111. Learning Laboratory. (4) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, 100B, 110. Designed for departmental majors. Laboratory experience with techniques in study of learning, especially with animals. Letter grading.

112A. Basic Processes of Motivated Behavior. (4) Lecture, 90 minutes; discussion, 90 minutes. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, 110. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of some basic processes underlying motivated behavior, stressing environmental determinants of behaviors such as feeding, drinking, and reproduction-related behavior. Discussion of physiological mechanisms that contribute to such behaviors. Consideration of topics such as reinforcement, acquired motivation, and drug addiction. Evaluation of evidence obtained in laboratory studies conducted with animals. P/NP or letter grading.

112B. Psychobiology of Fear and Anxiety. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, 110. Recommended: course 115. Designed for juniors/seniors. Presentation of biological and behavioral approaches to fear and anxiety, taken from laboratory and applied research. In addition to overview of major principles from each approach, emphasis on areas in which significant research advances have recently occurred. Examination of concordance and discordance between results from laboratory and applied research. P/NP or letter grading.

112C. Psychobiology of Anxiety and Depression. (4) Lecture, two and one half hours; discussion, 30 minutes. Requisites: courses 110 and 115, or Neuroscience M101A, M101B, and M101C. Limited to juniors/seniors. Presentation of biological and behavioral approaches to anxiety and depression, taken from laboratory and applied research. In addition to overview of major principles from each approach, emphasis on areas in which significant research advances have recently occurred. Examination of concordance and discordance between results from laboratory and applied research. P/NP or letter grading.

112D. Animal Cognition. (4) Lecture, 90 minutes; discussion, 90 minutes. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, 110. Designed for juniors/seniors. Investigation of scientific study of cognition and behavior in animals. Topics include perception and attention, working and reference memory, spatial cognition, timing and counting, concept formation, and abstract reasoning. Most discussions focus on laboratory findings with animals, as viewed from evolutionary framework concerned with natural histories of animals. P/NP or letter grading.

115. Principles of Behavioral Neuroscience. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: course 100A, Life Sciences 2 or 7A or 15. Not open to students with credit for course M117A (or Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology M175A or Neuroscience M101A or Physiological Science M180A). Designed for juniors/seniors. Nervous system anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, and their relationship to behavior. P/NP or letter grading.

116. Behavioral Neuroscience Laboratory. (4) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, 100B, 115. Designed for Psychobiology and Psychology majors. Laboratory experience with various topics in behavioral neuroscience. P/NP or letter grading.

M117A-M117B-M117C. Neuroscience: From Molecules to Mind. (5-5-5) (Same as Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology M175A-M175B-M175C, Neuroscience M101A-M101B-M101C, and Physiological Science M180A-M180B-M180C.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, 90 minutes. P/NP or letter grading:

M117A. Cellular and Systems Neuroscience. (5) Lecture, four hours; discussion, 90 minutes. Requisites: Chemistry 14C or 30A (14C may be taken concurrently), Life Sciences 2 or 7C, Physics 1B or 1BH or 5C or 6B. Not open for credit to students with credit for Physiological Science 111A. For Neuroscience and Physiological Science majors, grade of C− or better is required to proceed to Neuroscience M101B or Physiological Science 111B. Cellular neurophysiology, membrane potential, action potentials, and synaptic transmission. Sensory systems and motor system; how assemblies of neurons process complex information and control movement. P/NP or letter grading.

M117B. Molecular and Developmental Neuroscience. (5) Lecture, four hours; discussion, 90 minutes. Requisites: course 115 or M117A (or Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology M175A or Neuroscience M101A or Physiological Science M180A; Neuroscience majors must have grade of C− or better) or Physiological Science 111A, Life Sciences 3 and 4 (4 may be taken concurrently), or 7C. Molecular biology of channels and receptors: focus on voltage dependent channels and neurotransmitter receptors. Molecular biology of supramolecular mechanisms: synaptic transmission, axonal transport, cytoskeleton, and muscle. Classical experiments and modern molecular approaches in developmental neurobiology. P/NP or letter grading.

M117C. Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience. (5) Lecture, four hours; discussion, 90 minutes. Requisite: course 115 or M117A (or Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology M175A or Neuroscience M101A or Physiological Science M180A; Neuroscience majors must have grade of C− or better) or Physiological Science 111A. Neural mechanisms underlying motivation, learning, and cognition. P/NP or letter grading.

M117J. Biological Bases of Psychiatric Disorders. (4) (Same as Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology M181, Neuroscience M130, Physiological Science M181, and Psychiatry M181.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115 or M117A (or Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology M175A or Neuroscience M101A or Physiological Science M180A) or Physiological Science 111A. Underlying brain systems involved in psychiatric symptoms and neurological disorders, including schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, obsessive/compulsive disorder. Provides basic understanding of brain dysfunctions that contribute to disorders and rationales for pharmacological treatments. P/NP or letter grading.

118. Comparative Psychobiology. (4) Requisite: course 115. Designed for junior/senior majors. Survey of determinants of species-specific behavior, including genetic influences and learning.

119A. Neuropsychopharmacology of Emotion and Cognition. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115 or M117C. Limited to juniors/seniors. Analysis of basic pharmacologic principles, with emphasis on neurochemical modulation of emotional regulation and cognitive processes in normal and diseased state. P/NP or letter grading.

119B. Human Neurophysiology. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115. Designed for juniors/seniors. Exploration of biological basis of human cognitive processing, with emphasis on function of cerebral cortex.

119C. Cognitive Neuroscience. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115 or M117C. Understanding complex mental functions depends on interplay of cognitive psychology and behavioral neuroscience. Designed to provide advanced undergraduate students with current perspectives on how complex processes of mind may be understood using neuroscience techniques. P/NP or letter grading.

119D. Behavioral Neuropharmacology. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115. Limited to juniors/seniors. Biochemical and neural basis of psychotropic drug action. Particular emphasis on pharmacological regulation of neurotransmission and relationship of these processes to mental disorders. P/NP or letter grading.

119E. Stress and Bodily Disease. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115. Designed for juniors/seniors. Psychobiological processes as they pertain to development of stress responses and disease states. Consideration of stress-related topics, including behavioral and pharmacological variables in stress and stress management.

119F. Neural Basis of Behavior. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115. Designed for juniors/seniors. Presentation of current data and theory concerning how neuron circuits produce behavior. Mechanisms of perception, response selection, motor pattern generation, learning, and motivation, with emphasis on operation of these processes in well-defined neural circuits in animals and humans. P/NP or letter grading.

119G. Brain, Mind, and Motion Pictures. (4) Lecture, 90 minutes; screenings/discussion, two and one half hours. Requisite: course 115. Limited to juniors/seniors. Exploration of cognitive neuroscience of film from three perspectives: how advanced brain research is represented in films of period, how modern cognitive neuroscience explains experience of watching movies, and neuropsychology of acting in movies. P/NP or letter grading.

119I. Integration of Face and Brain. (4) Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 115 or M117C. Faces play major role in social interactions in both humans and nonhuman primates and in other animals as well. Exploration of neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, and neurofunctional underpinnings of face processing (attractiveness, emotional expressions, facial skin, identity recognition, based on empirical studies that use behavioral responses in neuroimaging techniques, in effects of types of brain damage, in physiological responses, and in psychopathological states. Discussion of evolutionary approaches to faces, as well as relationship between specific genetic mutations affecting both brain and facial appearance. P/NP or letter grading.

119J. Brain Bugs: Understanding Brain through Its Flaws. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115 or M117C. Designed for juniors/seniors. Psychology of brain flaws and limitations to understand how brain works by studying what it does well and understanding neuroscience of why brain is poorly suited to perform some tasks such as numerical calculations, memorizing lists and names, and making unbiased decisions. Topics include memory (types of memory, false memories, misinformation and memory, memory capacity) and cognitive biases (framing, anchoring, and temporal discounting). Exploration of underlying neural causes of brain flaws and limitations in context of brain’s associative architecture. Basic neurophysiology, synaptic plasticity, cortical plasticity, neural basis of learning and memory, and some computational neuroscience. P/NP or letter grading.

119K. Neurophilosophy. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115. Philosophy of mind has relied on introspection and thought experiments to explore consciousness, self, and free will. Field of neurophilosophy employs findings and methods of neuroscience to investigate these seemingly impenetrable constructs. Provides students with foundation in neurophilosophy, which includes basic understanding of philosophy of mind, consideration of phenomena including consciousness, volition, and self, and examination of scientific methods available for studying these phenomena. Exploration of student experiences of world and themselves within and demonstrations of how alterations in brain functioning due to injury, psychedelic drugs, and dreaming result in alterations in these phenomena. P/NP or letter grading.

M119L. Human Neuropsychology. (4) (Same as Neuroscience M119L.) Lecture, three hours. Recommended requisites: courses 115 (or M117A and M117C), 120A or 120B. Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of experimental and clinical human neuropsychology; neural basis of higher cognitive functions. P/NP or letter grading.

119M. Neural Circuits of Learning and Memory. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115. Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to classical and current literature on mechanisms of learning and memory from individual brain systems to circuits. P/NP or letter grading.

M119N. Visual System. (4) (Same as Neuroscience M119N.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115 or Neuroscience M101A or Physiological Science 111A. Ability to image and analyze visual world is truly remarkable feat. Coverage of anatomy and physiology of visual processing from retina to visual cortex through lectures, extensive reading, and discussions. P/NP or letter grading.

M119O. Psychology of Aging. (4) (Same as Gerontology M119O.) Requisite: course 115. Designed for juniors/seniors. Aging refers to developmental changes occurring at end stages of life. Some alterations that occur represent improvement, others are detrimental. Examination of impact of aging process on mental phenomena and exploration of ways in which positive changes can be maximally utilized and impact of detrimental alterations minimized. P/NP or letter grading.

119P. Emerging Topics in Neuroscience. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 115. Emerging advanced lecture topics in neuroscience given by visiting speakers, with additional lectures by instructor on relevant background material. Reading of published scientific articles. P/NP or letter grading.

119Q. Psychobiology of Sleep and Dreams. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of measurement of sleep, comparison of sleep in mammal species and sleep in sub-mammalian species, circadian rhythms and circadian control of sleep, development and aging of sleep, brain anatomical and neurochemical control of sleep, effects of sleep deprivation, sleep in psychiatric disorders, human sleep disorders, and properties of dreams. P/NP or letter grading.

119R. Neurobiology of Visual Cognition. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115. Designed for juniors/seniors. Review of some recent advances in understanding of neurobiology of visual cognition. Topics include how is visual information processed by brain to generate actions? How do we recognize objects? How do we perceive emotions displayed by other subjects? P/NP or letter grading.

119S. Neural Basis of Learning and Computing with Neurons. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115. Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to neural basis of learning and memory. Examination of current theories of what happens in brain when we learn and acquire new information. Introduction to how brain may use neural networks for learning and pattern recognition. How neural networks perform computations. P/NP or letter grading.

119T. Neural Basis of Emotion and Motivation. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115 or M117C. Limited to juniors/seniors. Neural basis of primary emotions, emotional regulation, and stress. Impact of emotion, stress, and arousal on motivated behaviors and cognitive processes. P/NP or letter grading.

119U. Neural Correlates of Psychotic Disorders. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115. Designed for juniors/seniors. Exploration of genetic, cellular, structural, and functional abnormalities associated with psychotic states, including those seen in schizophrenia spectrum disorders, bipolar disorder, and drug-induced psychosis. Focus on common and unique neural findings associated with these abnormal states. Study includes review of clinical aspects of disorders covered. P/NP or letter grading.

119V. Brain and Art. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115. Multiple forms of art express uniqueness of human brain and mind. Discussion of neural underpinnings of art in artist and viewer and links to evolutionary, biological, aesthetic, cognitive, and social roots of art. P/NP or letter grading.

M119X. Biology and Behavioral Neuroscience of Aging. (4) (Same as Gerontology M119X.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Biologic mechanisms of aging process and its terminal phase, death, have been increasingly studied in recent years. Establishment of what is known experimentally about biology and behavioral neuroscience of aging and evaluation of theories developed to account for this knowledge. P/NP or letter grading.

119Y. Psychobiology of Sexual Behavior. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 115. Broad overview of scientific study of sexual behavior, with emphases on evolutionary, biological, psychological, and social considerations. Topics include historical antecedents of sex research, evolution of sex, influence of sex hormones on brain and behavior, sexual development, and roles of genes and hormones on sexual orientation. P/NP or letter grading.

120A. Cognitive Psychology. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of cognitive psychology: how people acquire, represent, transform, and use verbal and nonverbal information. Perception, attention, imagery, memory, representation of knowledge, language, action, decision making, thinking. P/NP or letter grading.

120B. Sensation and Perception. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Designed for juniors/seniors. Acquisition of information about physical world through basic sensory mechanisms and perceptual processes. Perception of objects, surfaces, space, motion, and events. Connections between information, computations, and biological mechanisms in vision, audition, and other systems. P/NP or letter grading.

121. Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology. (4) Laboratory, four hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, 100B, 120A or 120B. Designed for Psychology and Cognitive Science majors. Laboratory experience with methods and phenomena from research on human perception, memory, and cognition. P/NP or letter grading.

124A. Advanced Topics in Sensation and Perception. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, 120A or 120B. Designed for juniors/seniors. Contemporary research and theory about visual and auditory perception. Topics include physiological mechanisms, psychophysical studies and models, and computational approaches. P/NP or letter grading.

124B. Visual Information Processing. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, 120A or 120B. Exploration of issues in visual information, such as storage and representation of visual information in memory, pattern recognition, nature and role of attention in visual processing, word and picture recognition, object perception, and imagery. Possible consideration of developmental aspects. P/NP or letter grading.

124C. Human Memory. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 120A or 120B. Designed for juniors/seniors. Analysis of recent research on basic processes and structural components that comprise the human memory system. Discussion topics include practical implications of such research for instruction, marketing, and witness testimony. P/NP or letter grading.

124D. Consciousness: Current Debates. (4) Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 100B, 115. Designed for juniors/seniors. Review of current issues in research on cognitive neuroscience of consciousness, with focus on modern theories of conscious perception, especially in visual modality so as to reflect its dominance in consciousness research. P/NP or letter grading.

124E. Language and Cognition. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, and 120A or 120B. Designed for juniors/seniors. Recent theories of language and cognition; nature of categories, feedback, and error detection in language and cognition; modularity; ambiguity; knowledge acquisition; processes and representations underlying perception, production, attention, and awareness in language and cognition. P/NP or letter grading.

124F. Thinking. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 120A or 120B. Analysis of experimental studies of human categorization, reasonings, decision making, problem solving, creativity, and related topics. P/NP or letter grading.

124J. Perception, Learning, and Learning Technology. (4) Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 120A or 120B. Aspects of perception and cognition as they relate to learning and potential for learning technology. Basic knowledge about visual information processing, perceptual learning, knowledge representation, pattern recognition, attention, memory, and expertise, as well as research on learning, technology, and applications of perceptual and cognitive concepts in specific domains, with special focus on teaching and learning in mathematics. P/NP or letter grading.

124K. Ethical, Legal, and Societal Implications of Cognitive Neuroscience. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 120A or 120B. Designed for juniors/seniors. Critical examination of current and potential use of neuroimaging data in legal system as means to assess memories, truthfulness, culpability, and probability of future criminal behavior. Consideration of personal and societal consequences of use of cognitively enhancing drugs, memory dampening techniques, brain stimulation, and neural prostheses. Students debate range of current topics. P/NP or letter grading.

125A. Developmental Psychopathology. (4) Seminar, three hours; fieldwork, seven hours. Research approaches utilized by psychologists in Fernald Research Intern Program to conduct research in developmental psychopathology in context of direct experience. Interns provided with necessary background to undertake various research activities during Winter and Spring Quarters. P/NP grading.

125B. Research Methods in Developmental Psychopathology. (4) Laboratory, three hours; fieldwork, seven hours. Limited to departmental majors. Research approaches utilized by psychologists to conduct research in developmental psychopathology. Letter grading.

125C. Advanced Research Methods in Developmental Psychopathology. (4) Laboratory, three hours; fieldwork, seven hours. Limited to departmental majors. Advanced research approaches utilized by psychologists to conduct research in developmental psychopathology. Letter grading.

126. Clinical Psychology Laboratory. (4) Laboratory, four hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, 100B, and 127A or 127B or 127C. Designed for departmental majors. Methods, designs, and issues in conduct of clinical psychology research. Students develop and conduct research. Content varies by instructor, with concentration on one of following: schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, childhood disorders, psychophysiological methods, observational methods with couples and families. Letter grading.

127A. Abnormal Psychology. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 10. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 127B or 127C. Study of psychological disorders (e.g., depression, anxiety, substance use disorders, schizophrenia) across lifespan, including role of biological, behavioral, social, cognitive, and cultural factors, diagnosis and treatment approaches. Discussion of Stigma and practices that support inclusiveness. P/NP or letter grading.

127B. Abnormal Psychology: Biological Bases. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 10. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 127A or 127C. Study of Biological processes involved in etiology, presentation, and course of psychiatric disorders, and biological targets or mechanisms of treatment. Emphasis on clinical neuroscience and behavioral genetics as scientific modalities to understand mood disorders, substance use disorders, psychosis, and others. P/NP or letter grading.

127C. Abnormal Psychology: Developmental Perspectives. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 10. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 127A or 127B. Study of abnormal child development from infancy through adolescence and early adulthood. Clinical disorders include behavioral disorders, depression/anxiety, alcohol/substance disorders, eating disorders, and autism spectrum disorder. P/NP or letter grading.

129A. Personality Measurement. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Rationale, methods, and content of studies dealing with problems of describing persons in terms of a limited set of dimensions. Detailed consideration of research literature dealing with a few representative personality dimensions. P/NP or letter grading.

129C. Culture and Mental Health. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Introduction to study of culture and human behavior in general, and culture and mental health in particular. Emphasis on cultural groups that comprise major U.S. ethnic groups (i.e., African Americans, Latinos/Chicanos, Asian Americans, and American Indians). P/NP or letter grading.

129D. Personality. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 10. Survey of major topics in field of personality, including personality theory, personality assessment, and physiological, behavioral, and cultural role of perception, learning, and motivation in personality. P/NP or letter grading.

129E. Human Sexuality. (4) Lecture, three hours. Designed for senior Psychology majors. Overview of psychology of human sexuality. Psychological research, assessment, and therapy described in a format which highlights their significance for understanding human sexual functioning. Psychological mechanisms underlying expression of human sexuality. P/NP or letter grading.

129F. Clinical Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 127A or 127B or 127C. Survey of child and adolescent psychopathology and psychotherapy from a developmental perspective. Coverage includes such conditions as anxiety disorders, depression, conduct and attention problems, eating disorders, and autism, with information on prevalence, causes, common treatments and their effects. P/NP or letter grading.

130. Developmental Psychology. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Designed for juniors/seniors. Elaboration of developmental aspects of physical, mental, social, and emotional growth from birth to adolescence. P/NP or letter grading.

131. Research in Developmental Psychology. (4) Discussion, one hour; laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, 100B, and 130 or one course from 133A through 133I. Designed for Psychology and Cognitive Science majors. Forms of scientific writing; ethics of research, especially with minors; special advantages and problems of asking developmental research questions; relevant methodologies for experimental and observational work; data analyses and data presentation options. Letter grading.

132A. Learning Problems, Schooling Problems: Policy and Practice. (4) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Exploration of different orientations to persons with learning problems, emphasizing assessment and intervention approaches and psychological impact of such approaches. Topics include interaction of learner and environment, sociopolitical nature of classroom, psychological impact of schooling, grades, and evaluations, process versus goal focus in learning. P/NP or letter grading.

132B. Mental Health in Schools: Policy and Practice. (4) Seminar, three hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Policies, models, and mechanisms for mental health in schools. Psychopathology placed into broader perspective of normal development and psychosocial problems to explore range of theoretical, practical, and ethical issues. P/NP or letter grading.

133A. Adolescent Development. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Examination of cognitive, social, physical, and physiological development of the adolescent. P/NP or letter grading.

133B. Cognitive Development. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Major theories, approaches, and issues in study of cognitive development. Readings include original research on important topics such as development of perception, language, thinking, and problem solving, and acquisition of concepts and domain-specific language. P/NP or letter grading.

133C. Language Development. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Application of principles of cognitive development, learning, and perception to study of language development. Topics include first and second language acquisition (sounds, meanings, grammatical structures), learning mechanisms, communication skills, and relation between language and thought in children. P/NP or letter grading.

133D. Social and Personality Development. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Theory and research on social and personality development during childhood. Topics include parent/child attachment, temperament, self-control, aggression, sex-typing, self-concept, moral reasoning and behavior, social status and social skills, and peer group relations. P/NP or letter grading.

133E. Perceptual Development. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Topics include origins and development of human perceptual abilities, origins of knowledge about functionally important aspects of the environment, ecological and computational issues in perception, research and theory about initial perceptual capacities, and some sensory foundations. P/NP or letter grading.

133F. Psychology and Education. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Application of principles of cognitive development, learning, and perception to educational problems. Topics include general instructional issues, psychology of reading and mathematics, exceptional children, early childhood education, and education of the disadvantaged. P/NP or letter grading.

133G. Culture and Human Development. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Role of culture in human development through psychology, anthropology, and autobiography. Students relate material from lectures and readings, through empirical research projects, to diverse cultural backgrounds in class, at UCLA, and in the broader community. P/NP or letter grading.

133I. Applied Developmental Psychology. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Application of developmental psychology to issues pertaining to improving well-being of children and their families. Topics include quality of child care, patterns and ranges of normal child behaviors, developmental disabilities, safety, legal, and public policy issues, child-rearing practices. P/NP or letter grading.

134A. Applied Developmental Psychology: Infant/Toddler Care and Education. (4) Lecture, three hours. Designed for Applied Developmental Psychology minors. Coverage of children zero to three years old. Topics include physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of children, developmentally appropriate practices, child care quality, role of educator/caregiver, and other related issues. Letter grading.

134B. Applied Developmental Psychology: Preschool/School-Age Care and Education. (4) Lecture, three hours. Designed for Applied Developmental Psychology minors. Coverage of children three to eight years old. Topics include physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of children, developmentally appropriate practices, child care quality, role of educator/caregiver, and other related issues. Letter grading.

134C. Advanced Applied Developmental Psychology. (4) Seminar, one hour; fieldwork, eight hours. Requisites: courses 134A, 134B, 134D, 134E. Designed for Applied Developmental Psychology minors. Continuing fieldwork in advanced applications of developmental psychology to support and illustrate, in applied setting, theories and research findings presented in lecture. P/NP grading.

134D. Fieldwork in Applied Developmental Psychology. (2) Fieldwork, 86 hours per term. Enforced corequisite: course 134A. Designed for Applied Developmental Psychology minors. Fieldwork in applications of developmental psychology to support and illustrate, in applied setting, theories and research findings presented in lecture. P/NP grading.

134E. Advanced Fieldwork in Applied Developmental Psychology. (2) Fieldwork, 86 hours per term. Enforced corequisite: course 134B. Designed for Applied Developmental Psychology minors. Fieldwork in advanced applications of developmental psychology to support and illustrate, in applied setting, theories and research findings presented in lecture. P/NP grading.

134F. Infant Care and Development. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: course 10, one course from 130 or 133B through 133I, one statistics course. In-depth study of research methods, current research findings, and theories used to understand infant development from conception through second year of life, including cross-cultural application of this knowledge to various populations. P/NP or letter grading.

134G. Early Childhood Curriculum. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: course 10, one course from 130 or 133B through 133I, one statistics course. Examination of methods, materials, and philosophies that enhance development of children in context of childcare settings. Topics include issues of multiculturalism, antibias curriculum, and special needs adaptations. P/NP or letter grading.

134I. Child, Family, and Community. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: course 10, one course from 130 or 133B through 133I, one statistics course. Exploration of role of early childhood educators within context of diverse racial, ethnic, economic, and cultural backgrounds and impact of these dynamics on children’s development. P/NP or letter grading.

135. Social Psychology. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Designed for juniors/seniors. Interrelationships between the individual and his social environment. Social influences on motivation, perception, and behavior. Development and change of attitudes and opinions. Psychological analysis of small groups, social stratification, and mass phenomena. P/NP or letter grading.

136A. Social Psychology Laboratory. (4) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, 100B, 135. Designed for Psychology majors. Introduction to research designs and methods used to test social psychological hypothesis, including experiments, observation, content analysis, and/or questionnaires. P/NP or letter grading.

136B. Nonexperimental Methods in Social Psychology. (4) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, 100B, 135. Designed for Psychology majors. Research experience with nonexperimental methods for study of social attitudes or behavior, including fieldwork with survey research, naturalistic observation, or questionnaires. P/NP or letter grading.

136C. Survey Methods in Psychology. (4) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, 100B, 135. Designed for Psychology majors. Survey research in psychology, with particular emphasis on surveys of social and political attitudes. Actual experience in systematic survey research such as that done by media polling agencies, market research companies, and academic survey research centers. Topics include survey design, sampling, interviewing techniques, response rates, questionnaire design, data coding, and analysis. Training in telephone interviewing techniques in laboratories. P/NP or letter grading.

137A. Sport Psychology. (4) Lecture, three hours. Designed for junior/senior Psychology majors. Introduction to field of sport psychology. Coverage of research and applied aspects of a range of topics, including youth sport participants as well as world-class performers.

M137B. Nonverbal Communication and Body Language. (4) (Same as Communication M113.) Lecture, three hours. Examination of how various forms of nonverbal communication convey meaningful information to perceivers, with focus on both production and perception of multiple communication formats (e.g., affect expression of face and body, gesture, and kinematics), with strong emphasis on body language. Readings from variety of related fields. P/NP or letter grading.

137C. Intimate Relationships. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Limited to juniors/seniors. Introduction to how social scientists think about, study, and treat intimate relationships, with emphasis on understanding how relationships change over time. Topics include attraction, relationship formation, conflict resolution, social support, sex, role of individual differences, and external circumstances. P/NP or letter grading.

137D. Psychology of Diversity. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: course 10. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of how culture, socioeconomic class, ethnicity, gender, and other group differences are created, perceived, and maintained. Emphasis on how scientific evidence informs approaches to contemporary problems including management of diverse workforce, immigrant integration, racial tensions, and health/educational disparities. P/NP or letter grading.

M137E. Work Behavior of Women and Men. (4) (Same as Gender Studies M137E.) Lecture, two and one half hours. Requisite: course 10 or Gender Studies 10. Designed for seniors. Examination of work behavior of women and men. Topics include antecedents of career choice, job findings, leadership, performance evaluation, discrimination and evaluation bias, job satisfaction, and interdependence of work and family roles. P/NP or letter grading.

137F. Introduction to Sport Psychology. (4) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of topics in sport psychology, including leadership and team dynamics, moral development and aggression, personality, motivation, fan behavior, and performance enhancement. Consideration of youth sport through world-class athletics. P/NP or letter grading.

137G. Social Cognitive Neuroscience. (4) Lecture, three hours. Principles of social cognitive neuroscience (SCN) and survey of broad array of topics in field. SCN is fundamental merging of social science questions and neuroscience methods, with particular emphasis on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). P/NP or letter grading.

137J. Self and Identity. (4) Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 10. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of theory and research that addresses self from social psychological perspective. Topics focus on self-knowledge, how self is represented in memory, illusions about self, self-esteem, implicit (subconscious) self, self-regulation, social comparison, self-relevant emotions, and influence of culture on self. P/NP or letter grading.

137K. Psychology of Emotion. (4) Lecture, three hours. Designed for junior/senior psychology majors. Broad overview of science of human emotion. Covers topics such as history of emotion research, current dominant models of emotion, purpose of facial expressions, experience of emotions in our closest social relationships, how we regulate our emotions, whether emotions can make us sick, and what it means to be happy. Exploration of range of perspectives in psychology, ranging from social, cultural, developmental, health, and clinical psychology. Consideration also of cognitive and behavioral neuroscience. P/NP or letter grading.

M138. Electoral Politics: Political Psychology. (4) (Same as Political Science M141A.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 10. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of political behavior, political socialization, personality and politics, racial conflict, and psychological analysis of public opinion on these issues.

M139. Perspectives on Autism and Neurodiversity. (4) (Same as Disability Studies M139.) Seminar, three and one half hours. Genealogy of autism as diagnostic category and cultural phenomenon from its historical roots as new, rare, and obscure condition in early 1940s to its current contested status as minority identity and/or global epidemic. Examination of material sourced from various fields and disciplines invested in autism, including psychology, neuroscience, arts and humanities, popular media, anthropology, activism, and critical autism studies. Students encounter and analyze multiple perspectives on autism and put them in conversation with one another. Attention paid to way people on spectrum define, explain, and represent their own experiences of autism and discussion of what ramifications of these multiple framings are in context of autism intervention strategy and disability policy today. Letter grading.

M140. Introduction to Study of Aging. (4) (Same as Social Welfare M140.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Perspectives on major features of human aging — biological, social, psychological, and humanistic. Introduction to information on range of influences on aging to prepare students for subsequent specialization. P/NP or letter grading.

142H. Advanced Statistical Methods in Psychology (Honors). (4) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Requisites: courses 100A, 100B. Survey of statistical techniques commonly used in psychology, education, and behavioral and social sciences: correlational techniques, analysis variance, and multiple regression. P/NP or letter grading.

M144. Measurement and Its Applications. (4) (Same as Statistics M154.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: one course from 100A, Statistics 10, 12, or 13. Selected theories for quantification of psychological, educational, social, and behavioral science data. Classical test, factor analysis, generalizability, item response, optimal scaling, ordinal measurement, computer-adaptive, and related theories. Construction of tests and measures and their reliability, validity, and bias. P/NP or letter grading.

M147A. Psychology of Lesbian Experience. (4) (Same as Gender Studies M147A and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies M147A.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 10 or Gender Studies 10 or Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies M114. Designed for juniors/seniors. Review of research and theory in gender studies and psychology to examine various aspects of lesbian experience, impact of heterosexism/stigma, gender role socialization, minority status of women and lesbians, identity development within a multicultural society, changes in psychological theories about lesbians in sociohistorical context. P/NP or letter grading.

M149. Language Development and Socialization. (4) (Same as Anthropology M152P.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Exploration of processes through which children learn structures and practices of language and become competent participants in linguistic and social worlds around them. Examination of language use and socialization over childhood, across communities of practice, and across different ethnic and socioeconomic groups. Bridges work from anthropology, psychology, linguistics, and cognitive science. Topics include cross-cultural perspectives on child development and wide range of methodological approaches. Examination of ways in which language development and socialization interface with culture, modality, inequality, education, and cognition. P/NP or letter grading.

150. Introduction to Health Psychology. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 10. Areas of health, illness, treatment, and delivery of treatment that can be elucidated by understanding of psychological concepts and research, psychological perspective on these problems, and how psychological perspective might be enlarged and extended in medical area. P/NP or letter grading.

151. Research Methods in Health Psychology. (4) Laboratory, four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10, 100A, 100B, 150. Research methods used in health psychology, including experimental, quasi-experimental, and nonexperimental methods. Examples and projects from health psychology. Letter grading.

152. Mind-Body Interactions and Health. (4) Lecture, three hours. Designed for junior/senior Psychology and Psychobiology majors. Examination of bidirectional interactions between mind and body and how these interactions influence physical health. Topics include impact of stress, emotions, personality, and social world on biological systems and health. Discussion of mind-body interventions designed to reduce stress and improve health, including scientific research on yoga and meditation. P/NP or letter grading.

160. Genetics of Human Cognition and Behavior. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, and 127A or 127B or 127C. Limited to juniors/seniors. Survey of field of behavior genetics, including methods for determining genetic and environmental influences and for locating and characterizing genes impacting these traits, as well as current knowledge of genetic contributions to cognition and behavior and disorders thereof. P/NP or letter grading.

161. Behavior and Brain Development. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A. Limited to juniors/seniors. Exploration of relationship between brain development and behavior. Examination of how cognitive neuroscience can inform study of development and how developmental approach can advance progress in cognitive and developmental sciences. P/NP or letter grading.

162. Psychology of Addiction. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Survey of topics covering psychological and neurobiological theories of addiction, pharmacological effects of drugs and abuse, etiology, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. P/NP or letter grading.

M163. Death, Suicide, and Trauma. (4) (Same as Sociology M138.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Sociological analysis of incidence of violent death. Suicide is eighth leading cause of death in U.S. and third leading cause for young people aged 15 to 24. Both kinds of violent deaths are often dismissed as extreme psychopathology, reflecting individual mental health issues. Sociologists argue that suicide and homicide are social facts. Suicide and homicide do not occur randomly in society but are stratified according to social factors such as age, gender, race, sexual orientation, and class. Analysis of strength of this sociological argument and evaluation of explanatory potential of different theories to make sense of violent death, paying particular attention to forensic and medicolegal system to determine suicide and solve homicides. Review of historic and contemporary studies to examine how research and conceptualizations of suicide and homicide have changed, as well as social responses to these phenomena. P/NP or letter grading.

164. Puberty and Sleep. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 10. Limited to juniors/seniors. Exploration of how normative biological and hormonal changes during adolescence influence adolescent behavior and well-being. Focus specifically on puberty and sleep, which both lead to consequential effects on behavior, health, and brain development. P/NP or letter grading.

M165. Psychology of Gender. (4) (Same as Gender Studies M165.) Lecture, three hours. Consideration of psychological literature relevant to understanding contemporary sex differences. Topics include sex-role development and role conflict, physiological and personality differences between men and women, sex differences in intellectual abilities and achievement, and impact of gender on social interaction. P/NP or letter grading.

M166. Neurobiology of Bias and Discrimination. (4) (Same as Neuroscience M187 and Physiological Science M106.) Lecture, three hours. Limited to junior/senior neuroscience, physiological science, and psychology students. Exploration of aspects of mammalian brain function that generate preference, bias, and discrimination. Consideration of research at multiple levels of analysis from genetics to neural circuits to behavior. Discussion of societal implications of these research findings, including their relevance to public policies and criminal justice system. Letter grading.

167. Digital Media and Human Development. (4) Lecture, three hours. Designed for junior/senior majors. Examination of social science research on media and technology during development to understand positive and negative roles of technology and media in children’s lives. Topics include social media, video games, brain development, and learning with technological tools from age 2 through 18 (and through emerging adulthood). May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

M172. Afro-American Woman in U.S. (4) (Same as African American Studies M172 and Gender Studies M172.) Lecture, two and one half hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Impact of social, psychological, political, and economic forces which impact on interpersonal relationships of Afro-American women as members of large society and as members of their biological and ethnic group. P/NP or letter grading.

173. Advanced Abnormal Psychology. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, and 127A or 127B or 127C. Examination of research and theory concerning origins, course, and outcomes of disordered behavior. Focus on continuity and change in patterns of behavior, assessment methods, and research approaches. Concentration on one of following: childhood disorders, anxiety and stress, schizophrenias, or mood disorders. P/NP or letter grading.

M174. Health Disparities. (4) (Formerly numbered 174.) (Same as Life Sciences M174.) Lecture, three hours. Examination of health disparities and ways in which societal responses to race and ethnicity in combination with variety of other factors create differential quality and access to healthcare resulting in poor health outcomes in racial/ethnic minorities. Basic foundation for critical thinking about assumptions that shape life sciences, medical research, clinical practice, and social and behavioral sciences as they relate to racial and ethnic minority populations and to teach students to integrate concepts of culture and health disparities into other social, biological, political, psychological, genetic, and clinical health interests. P/NP or letter grading.

175. Community Psychology. (4) Designed for junior/senior Psychology majors. Application of psychological principles to understanding and solution of community problems. Topics include community development, community mental health problems, drugs, racism, and rehabilitation of prisoners.

M176SL. Addressing Social Determinants in Racial/Ethnic Minority Communities to Reduce and Prevent Health Disparities. (4) (Same as Civic Engagement M175SL.) Seminar, two hours; fieldwork, 10 hours. Examination of how addressing social determinants in racial/ethnic minority communities can reduce or eliminate physical and mental health disparities. Currently in racial and ethnic minority communities, health status of individuals can be function of built environment, exposure to pollutants and toxins, scarcity of supermarkets or stores with fresh produce and nutritional food, noise levels, and variety of other stressors and unhealthy conditions. Health interventions are often focused on individual-level change or increases in access to healthcare with little in way of changing risk environments. Designed to identify and provide opportunities to understand how to address social determinants related to negative health outcomes in racial/ethnic minority neighborhoods and communities and to experience how to use social determinants literature in service of collaborative activities with community organizations. P/NP or letter grading.

177. Counseling Relationships. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Requisites: courses 10, 100A, and 127A or 127B or 127C. Designed for junior/senior Psychology majors. Conceptual and empirical foundations of psychological counseling; comparison of alternative models of counseling processes. Emphasis on counseling approaches in community mental health areas such as drug abuse, suicide prevention, and crisis intervention. P/NP or letter grading.

178. Human Motivation. (4) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of theories of human motivation, experimental findings supporting the theories, and history of study of motivation. Topics include sociobiology, conflict, aspiration level, achievement strivings, and causal attributions.

179A. Health Behavior and Health Status of Ethnic Groups: Behavioral Perspective. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 10. Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey course of psychological aspects of health behavior and health status in major ethnic groups in the U.S. Emphasis on major diseases outlined by the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS).

179B. Biomedical and Psychosocial Aspects of AIDS/HIV. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 150 or 179A or Health Policy 100. Designed for juniors/seniors. Basics of epidemiology of AIDS, routes of transmission, clinical characteristics of AIDS, neurological and psychological aspects of coping with HIV infection and AIDS. Presentation of biologic, behavioral, and therapeutic interventions. P/NP or letter grading.

M180. Contemporary Problems in Developmental Disabilities. (4) (Same as Psychiatry M180.) Seminar, three hours. Corequisite: course M181A. Limited to Developmental Disabilities Program students. Examination of broad spectrum of issues related to mental retardation, intelligence and IQ, genetics, neurobiology, and other developmental disabilities. P/NP or letter grading.

M181A. Research in Contemporary Problems in Developmental Disabilities. (4) (Same as Psychiatry M181A.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, eight hours. Corequisite: course M180. Limited to Developmental Disabilities Program students. Research experience. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course M181B).

M181B. Research in Contemporary Problems in Developmental Disabilities. (4) (Same as Psychiatry M181B.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, eight hours. Requisite: course M181A. Limited to Developmental Disabilities Program students. Research experience. Letter grading.

184A-184B. Psychology Research Opportunity Program Seminars. (2-2) Seminar, 90 minutes. Designed to bring together Psychology Research Opportunity Program (PROPS) students undertaking supervised tutorial research in seminar setting with one or more faculty members to discuss their own work or related work in discipline. Led by one supervising faculty member. P/NP grading.

185. Research Practicum in Psychology. (3) Laboratory, seven hours. Corequisite: course C194D. Limited to juniors/seniors. Practical applications of psychology through research under guidance of faculty mentor. Only 12 units from any combination of courses 185, 192, 194, 195, and 196 may be applied toward undergraduate degree. May not be applied toward course requirements for any Psychology Department major. Individual contract required. Information and contracts may be obtained from Undergraduate Advising Office, 1531 Franz Hall. P/NP grading.

186A. Cognitive Science Laboratory: Introduction to Theory and Simulation. (4) Laboratory, four hours. Requisites: courses 10, 85, 100A, 100B, Program in Computing 10A, 10B. Designed for junior/senior departmental majors. Models of cognition within framework of explanation at multiple levels of abstraction. Examples of elementary models in multiple psychological domains (e.g., visual perception, categorization, learning, reasoning, and problem solving). Types of models include neural networks and symbolic models. Lectures and discussions interwoven with computer simulations written in MATLAB. P/NP or letter grading.

186B. Cognitive Science Laboratory: Neural Networks. (4) Laboratory, four hours. Requisites: courses 10, 85, 100A, 100B, Mathematics 31A, 31B, Program in Computing 10A, 10B. Designed for junior/senior departmental majors. Laboratory experience in neural network modeling of perception and cognition. Specific topics include essential neurophysiology, basic architectures, learning, and programming techniques. Principles illustrated and discussed in context of models of specific perceptual and cognitive processes. Simulations written in Pascal. P/NP or letter grading.

186C. Cognitive Science Laboratory: Psychophysical Theories and Methods. (4) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Requisites: courses 10, 85, 100A, 100B. Designed for junior/senior departmental majors. Lectures and laboratory work that examine perceptual measurement procedures (psychophysical methods) and cognitive processing and decision models on which procedures are based, with particular emphasis on signal detection theory and its applications. Letter grading.

186D. Laboratory in Functional Neuroimaging. (4) Laboratory, four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10, 100A, 100B. Limited to departmental majors. Introduction to study of brain with functional resonance imaging (fMRI). All major aspects to be discussed, from physical basis of MR signal to data analysis. Letter grading.

187A. Psychology and Law. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of new topics on legal psychology, including suspect identification, witness reports, and police procedures. Outside speakers utilized in presentation of these materials. Students participate in presentations and/or discussions.

187B. Advanced Psychology and Law. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 187A. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of additional topics on legal psychology, including gang violence, theories of crime, corrections, repeat offenders, community policing, and interrogation. Outside speakers utilized in presentation of these materials. P/NP or letter grading.

187C. Sex and Law. (4) Lecture, three hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Examination of Constitutional foundation for sexual rights in America, with focus on freedoms of speech and press, right to privacy, and Ninth Amendment rights reserved by the people. P/NP or letter grading.

188A. Special Seminars: Psychology. (4) Seminar, three hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Departmentally sponsored experimental or temporary seminars on selected topics in psychology, such as those taught by visiting faculty members. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

188B. Special Courses in Psychology. (4) Lecture, three hours. Designed for junior/senior majors. Departmentally sponsored experimental or temporary courses on topics of psychological interest, such as those taught by visiting faculty members. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics and instructors. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

189. Advanced Honors Seminars. (1) Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

189HC. Honors Contracts. (1) Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to upper-division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

190. Research Colloquia in Psychology. (1) Seminar, one hour. Designed to bring together students undertaking supervised tutorial research in seminar setting with one or more faculty members to discuss their own work or related work in discipline. Led by one supervising faculty member. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

191. Variable Topics Research Seminars: Psychology. (1) Seminar, one hour. Limited to juniors/seniors. Research seminar on selected topics in psychology. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

191AH-191BH-191CH. Departmental Honors Research Seminars. (2-2-2) Seminar, two hours. Enforced corequisite: course 198. Course 191AH is requisite to 191BH, which is requisite to 191CH. Limited to psychology honors program students. Opportunity for development and analysis of creative ideas through individual research projects with faculty sponsor and discussion of student and faculty research presentations. Information and applications may be obtained from Undergraduate Advising Office, 1531 Franz Hall. If approved in advance by Undergraduate Office, courses 191CH and 198 may be applied toward elective course requirement for any Psychology Department major. Letter grading.

192. Education Practices in Psychology. (4) Seminar, three hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Training and supervised practicum for advanced undergraduate students to assist in courses related to psychology. Students assist in preparation of materials and development of innovative programs under guidance of faculty members and teaching assistants. Only 12 units from any combination of courses 185, 192, 194, 195, and 196 may be applied toward undergraduate degree. May not be applied toward course requirements for any Psychology Department major. Individual contract required. Information and contracts may be obtained from Undergraduate Advising Office, 1531 Franz Hall. P/NP grading.

193. Journal Club Seminars: Psychology. (1) Seminar, one hour. Limited to undergraduate students. Discussion of readings selected from current literature of particular field or attendance at and write-ups of speakers series. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

194A. Internship Seminars: Psychology. (2) Seminar, two hours. Corequisite: course 195A. Study of research methods, applications, and current literature through group discussion, presentation, and papers. Research fields and topics vary by instructor. Only 12 units from any combination of courses 185, 192, 194, 195, and 196 may be applied toward undergraduate degree. May not be applied toward course requirements for any Psychology Department major. Individual contract required. Information and contracts may be obtained from Undergraduate Advising Office, 1531 Franz Hall. P/NP grading.

194B. Research Group Seminars: Psychology. (1) Seminar, one hour. Corequisite: course 196A (3-unit option). Limited to juniors/seniors who are part of research group. Discussion of research methods and current literature in field or of research of faculty members or students. Only 12 units from any combination of courses 185, 192, 194, 195, and 196 may be applied toward undergraduate degree. May not be applied toward course requirements for any Psychology Department major. Individual contract required. Information and contracts may be obtained from Undergraduate Advising Office, 1531 Franz Hall. P/NP grading.

194C. Research Group Seminars: Cognitive Science. (1) Seminar, one hour. Corequisite: course 196B (3-unit option). Limited to junior/senior Cognitive Science majors who are part of research group. Discussion of research methods and current literature in field or of research of faculty members or students. Only 12 units from any combination of courses 185, 192, 194, 195, and 196 may be applied toward undergraduate degree. May be applied toward course requirements for Cognitive Science major. Individual contract required. Information and contracts may be obtained from Undergraduate Advising Office, 1531 Franz Hall. P/NP grading.

C194D. Research Group Seminars: Practicum. (1) Seminar, one hour. Corequisite: course 185. Designed for undergraduate students who are part of research group that meets with graduate students. Discussion of research methods and current literature in field or of research of faculty members or students. Only 12 units from any combination of courses 185, 192, 194, 195, and 196 may be applied toward undergraduate degree. May not be applied toward course requirements for any Psychology Department major. Individual contract required. Information and contracts may be obtained from Undergraduate Advising Office, 1531 Franz Hall. Concurrently scheduled with course C296B. P/NP grading.

195A. Community Internships in Psychology. (2) Tutorial (approved community setting), six hours. Corequisite: course 194A. Limited to juniors/seniors. Internship in applications of psychology in supervised setting in community agency or business. Students meet on regular basis with sponsor and provide periodic reports of their experience. Only 12 units from any combination of courses 185, 192, 194, 195, and 196 may be applied toward undergraduate degree. May not be applied toward course requirements for any Psychology Department major. Individual contract with supervising placement sponsor required. Information and contracts may be obtained from Undergraduate Advising Office, 1531 Franz Hall. P/NP grading.

195B. Corporate Internships in Cognitive Science. (4) Tutorial, eight hours. Limited to junior/senior Cognitive Science majors. Practical applications of cognitive science through internship experience in supervised setting. Students meet on regular basis with supervisor and provide periodic reports of their experience. Only 12 units from any combination of courses 185, 192, 194, 195, and 196 may be applied toward undergraduate degree. May be applied toward course requirements for Cognitive Science major. Individual contract with supervisor required. Information and contracts may be obtained from Undergraduate Advising Office, 1531 Franz Hall. P/NP grading.

196A. Research Apprenticeship in Psychology. (3 to 4) Tutorial, eight hours. Corequisite: course 194B. Limited to juniors/seniors. Practical applications of psychology through research under guidance of faculty mentor. Only 12 units from any combination of courses 185, 192, 194, 195, and 196 may be applied toward undergraduate degree. May not be applied toward course requirements for any Psychology Department major. Individual contract required. Information and contracts may be obtained from Undergraduate Advising Office, 1531 Franz Hall. P/NP grading.

196B. Research Apprenticeship in Cognitive Science. (3 to 4) Tutorial, eight hours. Corequisite: course 194C. Limited to junior/senior Cognitive Science majors. Practical applications of cognitive science through research under guidance of faculty mentor. Only 12 units from any combination of courses 185, 192, 194, 195, and 196 may be applied toward undergraduate degree. May be applied toward course requirements for Cognitive Science major. Individual contract required. Information and contracts may be obtained from Undergraduate Advising Office, 1531 Franz Hall. P/NP grading.

198. Honors Research in Psychology. (2) Tutorial, two hours. Enforced corequisite: course 191AH or 191BH or 191CH. Limited to juniors/seniors and psychology honors program students. Development and completion of honors thesis or comprehensive research project under direct supervision of faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. Information and contracts may be obtained from Undergraduate Advising Office, 1531 Franz Hall. Letter grading.

199A. Senior Project in Psychology. (4) Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research under guidance of psychology faculty mentor. Culminating paper required. Only one 4-unit 199 course may be taken per term. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. Information and contracts may be obtained from Undergraduate Advising Office, 1531 Franz Hall. P/NP grading.

199B. Senior Project in Psychology. (4) Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research under guidance of psychology faculty mentor. Culminating paper required. Only one 4-unit 199 course may be taken per term. May be taken only once for letter grade. Individual contract required. Information and contracts may be obtained from Undergraduate Advising Office, 1531 Franz Hall. Letter grading.