Aerospace Studies

Undergraduate Study

The Air Force ROTC program is available to full-time students with at least three years of undergraduate and/or graduate study remaining and consists of one to two years of the General Military Course, or GMC (Aerospace Studies 1A, 1B, 1C, 20A, 20B, and 20C), followed by a two-year Professional Officer Course, or POC (Aerospace Studies 130A, 130B, 130C, 140A, 140B, and 140C). For students completing the program in four years, GMC participation requires one hour of academic class and two hours of leadership laboratory each week during the academic year. For students completing the program in three years, GMC participation requires taking one course from Aerospace Studies 1A, 1B, or 1C, one course from 20A, 20B, or 20C, and two hours of leadership laboratory each week during the academic year. Students incur no military obligation for GMC participation unless they qualify and accept an Air Force ROTC scholarship during or after their sophomore year.

Students who complete the GMC and wish to enter the POC attend a four-week field training course the summer following GMC completion. There is no obligation to apply. U.S. citizenship is required. Students are selected on a competitive basis with consideration given to academic major, grade-point average, aptitude examination scores, performance during an officer board interview, and a physical fitness test. Students selected for summer field training are given meals, quarters, clothing, and travel and incidental expenses. Subjects covered at field training include junior officer training, aircraft and aircrew orientation, career orientation, survival training, base functions, Air Force environment, and physical training.

POC participation requires three hours of academic class and two hours of leadership laboratory each week during the academic year. Students enrolled in the POC incur a military obligation and are paid a monthly stipend during the academic year. Graduation and successful completion of the POC leads to a commission as a second lieutenant. Cadets then report to one of the challenging assignments in the Air Force.