Chemistry and Biochemistry Upper-Division Courses

C100. Genomics and Computational Biology. (5) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction for biochemistry students of technologies and experimental data of genomics, as well as computational tools for analyzing them. Biochemistry and molecular biology dissected life into its component parts, one gene at time, but lacked integrative mechanisms for putting this information back together to predict what happens in complete organism (e.g., over 80 percent of drug candidates fail in clinical trials). High-throughput technologies such as sequencing, microarrays, mass-spec, and robotics have given biologists incredible new capabilities to analyze complete genomes, expression patterns, functions, and interactions across whole organisms, populations, and species. Use and analysis of such datasets becomes essential daily activity for biomedical scientists. Core principles and methodologies for analyzing genomics data to answer biological and medical questions, with focus on concepts that guide data analysis rather than algorithm details. Concurrently scheduled with course C200. P/NP or letter grading.

103. Environmental Chemistry. (4) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 30B, 30BL, 110A, 153A (or 153AH), 153L. Chemical aspects of air and water pollution, solid waste disposal, energy resources, and pesticide effects. Chemical reactions in environment and effect of chemical processes on environment. P/NP or letter grading.

C105. Introduction to Chemistry of Biology. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 153A with grade of C- or better. Introduction to chemical biology. Topics include computational chemical biology, utility of synthesis in biochemical research, peptidomimetics, designed reagents for cellular imaging, natural product biosynthesis, protein engineering and directed evolution, cell biology of metal ions, imaging metal ions in cells, metal-containing drugs. Concurrently scheduled with course CM205A. Letter grading.

C107. Organometallic Chemistry. (4) Lecture/discussion, three hours. Enforced requisite or corequisite: course 172. Survey of synthesis, structure, and reactivity (emphasizing mechanistic approach) of compounds containing carbon bonded to elements selected from main group metals, metalloids, and transition metals, including olefin complexes and metal carbonyls; applications in catalysis and organic synthesis. Concurrently scheduled with course C207. P/NP or letter grading.

C108. Mass Spectrometry for Chemists and Biochemists. (2) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Requisite: course 153A. Introduction to principles and practice of organic and inorganic mass spectrometry. Topics include EI, CI, ICPMS, GC/MS, LC/MS, ESI, MALDI, MS/MS protein identification, and proteomics. Concurrently scheduled with course C208. P/NP or letter grading.

110A. Physical Chemistry: Chemical Thermodynamics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisites: course 20B, Mathematics 32A or 3C (for life sciences majors), Physics 1A, 1B, and 1C (may be taken concurrently), or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH (may be taken concurrently), or 5A, 5B, and 5C (may be taken concurrently), or 6A, 6B, and 6C (may be taken concurrently). Fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemical and phase equilibria, thermodynamics of solutions, electrochemistry. P/NP or letter grading.

110B. Physical Chemistry: Introduction to Statistical Mechanics and Kinetics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisites: courses 110A, 113A, Mathematics 32B. Kinetic theory of gases, principles of statistical mechanics, statistical thermodynamics, equilibrium structure and free energy, relaxation and transport phenomena, macroscopic chemical kinetics, molecular-level reaction dynamics. P/NP or letter grading.

113A. Physical Chemistry: Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisites: course 20B, Mathematics 32A, 32B, 33B, Physics 1A, 1B, and 1C, or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH, or 5A, 5B, and 5C, or 6A, 6B, and 6C, with grades of C- or better. Departure from classical mechanics: Schrödinger versus Newton equations; model systems: particle-in-box, harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor, and hydrogen atom; approximation methods: perturbation and variational methods; many-electron atoms, spin, and Pauli principle, chemical bonding. P/NP or letter grading.

C113B. Physical Chemistry: Introduction to Molecular Spectroscopy. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisite: course 113A. Interaction of radiation with matter, microwave spectroscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, vibrations in polyatomic molecules, electronic spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Concurrently scheduled with course C213B. P/NP or letter grading.

114. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (5) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 30AL, 110A, and 113A, with grades of C- or better. Enforced corequisite: course 110B or C113B. Lectures include techniques of physical measurement, error analysis and statistics, special topics. Laboratory includes spectroscopy, thermodynamic measurements, and chemical dynamics. P/NP or letter grading.

114H. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Honors). (5) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 30AL, 110A, and 113A, with grades of B or better. Enforced corequisite: course 110B or C113B. Lectures include techniques of physical measurement, error analysis and statistics, special topics. Laboratory includes topics in physical chemistry to be selected in consultation with instructor. P/NP or letter grading.

C115A-C115B. Quantum Chemistry. (4-4) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: course 113A, Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, with grades of C- or better. Recommended: knowledge of differential equations equivalent to Mathematics 134 or 135 or Physics 131 and of analytic mechanics equivalent to Physics 105A. Course C115A or Physics 115B with grade of C- or better is requisite to C115B. Students entering course C115A are normally expected to take course C115B in following term. Designed for chemistry students with serious interest in quantum chemistry. Postulates and systematic development of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics; expansion theorems; wells; oscillators; angular momentum; hydrogen atom; matrix techniques; approximation methods; time dependent problems; atoms; spectroscopy; magnetic resonance; chemical bonding. May be concurrently scheduled with courses C215A-C215B. P/NP or letter grading.

C115C. Advanced Quantum Chemistry: Applications. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 113A, C115B. Topics in quantum chemistry selected from molecular structure, collision processes, theory of solids, symmetry and its applications, and theory of electromagnetic radiation. Concurrently scheduled with course C215C. P/NP or letter grading.

M117. Structure, Patterns, and Polyhedra. (5) (Same as Honors Collegium M180.) Lecture, four hours; activity, two hours. Exploration of structures and their geometric underpinnings, with examples and applications from architecture (space frames, domes), biology (enzyme complexes, viruses), chemistry (symmetry, molecular cages), design (tiling), engineering (space filling), and physics (crystal structures) to effect working knowledge of symmetry, two-dimensional patterns, and three-dimensional solids. P/NP or letter grading.

118. Colloidal Dynamics Laboratory. (4) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Requisites: courses 110A and 110B, with grades of B or better, or equivalent statistical mechanics courses from engineering, mathematics, or physics. One aspect of dispersions of microscale particles in viscous liquids is that such dispersions can be used as visual model systems for studying phases that chemistry undergraduate students typically learn about for nanoscale and molecular systems, yet they do not see. Temperature continuously excites molecules and causes rearrangements, giving dynamic views of macromolecules and particles in many fields, including cell and molecular biology, chemical engineering, chemistry, materials science, and physics. Letter grading.

M120. Soft Matter Laboratory. (4) (Same as Physics M180G.) Laboratory, four hours. P/NP or letter grading.

121. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry. (4) Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 110B. Recommended: course 113A. Topics of considerable research interest presented at level suitable for students who have completed junior-year courses in physical chemistry. P/NP or letter grading.

C122. Mathematical Methods for Chemistry. (4) Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisites: Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B. Review of basic mathematics necessary to study physical chemistry at graduate level, with focus on review of vectors, linear algebra, elementary complex analysis, and solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. Development of problem-solving skills through homework based on these mathematical techniques, with examples from physical chemistry. Concurrently scheduled with course C222. P/NP or letter grading.

C123A-C123B. Classical and Statistical Thermodynamics. (4-4) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 110B or 156. Recommended: course 113A. Rigorous presentation of fundamentals of classical thermodynamics. Principles of statistical thermodynamics: probability, ensembles, partition functions, independent molecules, and perfect gas. Applications of classical and statistical thermodynamics selected from diatomic and polyatomic gases, solid and fluid states, phase equilibria, electric and magnetic effects, ortho-para hydrogen, chemical equilibria, reaction rates, imperfect gas, nonelectrolyte and electrolyte solutions, surface phenomena, high polymers, gravitation. May be concurrently scheduled with courses C223A-C223B. P/NP or letter grading.

125. Computers in Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours; computer laboratory, one hour. Requisites: courses 110A and 113A, with grades of C- or better. Discussion of data acquisition and instrument control, scientific programming and data analysis, structural databases and molecular modeling methods. Hands-on computer laboratory experience with wide range of open source and commercial scientific software. P/NP or letter grading.

C126A. Computational Methods for Chemists. (4) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, four hours. Preparation: programming experience in either BASIC, Fortran, C, C++, Java, or Pascal. Requisites: courses 110A, 113A, Mathematics 33A. Theoretical, numerical, and programming tools for constructing new chemical applications, including simple force fields and resulting statistical mechanics for simple molecules, simple ab-initio methods for organic molecules and nanotubes, and classical dynamics and spectroscopy. Concurrently scheduled with course C226A. P/NP or letter grading.

CM127. Synthetic Biology for Biofuels. (4) (Same as Chemical Engineering CM127.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 153A. Engineering microorganisms for complex phenotype is common goal of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Production of advanced biofuels involves designing and constructing novel metabolic networks in cells. Such efforts require profound understanding of biochemistry, protein structure, and biological regulations and are aided by tools in bioinformatics, systems biology, and molecular biology. Fundamentals of metabolic biochemistry, protein structure and function, and bioinformatics. Use of systems modeling for metabolic networks to design microorganisms for energy applications. Concurrently scheduled with course CM227. Letter grading.

136. Organic Structural Methods. (5) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Requisites: courses 30C and 30CL, with grades of C- or better. Laboratory course in organic structure determination by chemical and spectroscopic methods; microtechniques. P/NP or letter grading.

C140. Bionanotechnology. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 30C, 110A. Basic physical, chemical, and biological principles in bionanotechnology; materials and strategies for top-down and bottom-up fabrication of ordered biologically derived molecules, characterization and detection techniques, and biomimetic materials and applications at nanoscale. Concurrently scheduled with course C240. P/NP or letter grading.

C143A. Structure and Mechanism in Organic Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 30C and 30CL (may be taken concurrently), 110B, and 113A, with grades of C- or better. Mechanisms of organic reactions. Acidity and acid catalysis; linear free energy relationships; isotope effects. Molecular orbital theory; photochemistry; pericyclic reactions. May be concurrently scheduled with course C243A. P/NP or letter grading.

C143B. Mechanism and Structure in Organic Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course C143A with grade of C- or better. Mechanisms of organic reactions; structure and detection of reactive intermediates. May be concurrently scheduled with course C243B. P/NP or letter grading.

144. Practical and Theoretical Introductory Organic Synthesis. (5) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 30C and 30CL, with grades of C- or better. Lectures on modern synthetic reactions and processes, with emphasis on stereospecific methods for carbon-carbon bond formation. Laboratory methods of synthetic organic chemistry, including reaction techniques, synthesis of natural products, and molecules of theoretical interest. P/NP or letter grading.

C145. Theoretical and Computational Organic Chemistry. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; computer laboratory, one hour. Requisites: courses 30C, 113A. Applications of quantum mechanical concepts and methods to understand and predict organic structures and reactivities. Computational modeling methods, including laboratory experience with force-field and quantum mechanical computer calculations. Concurrently scheduled with course C245. P/NP or letter grading.

147. Careers in Chemistry and Biochemistry. (2) Seminar, two hours. Exploration of employment and career opportunities available to students. Different speakers give short presentations to describe their career paths in areas such as industry, government, research and development, education, law, and healthcare, explain how their education in chemistry and biochemistry helped them become successful, and what actual chemistry was used in their particular professions. Students learn and understand real-life applications of chemical concepts found in their coursework. P/NP grading.

C150. Research Methods and Integrity in Cellular and Molecular Biology. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Data analysis and management, statistical methods, use of antibody and kit reagents, figure preparation, authorship, mentoring, human subjects protection, animal subject protection, and conflict of interest. May be repeated for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C250. Letter grading.

153A. Biochemistry: Introduction to Structure, Enzymes, and Metabolism. (4) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 14D or 30B, with grade of C- or better. Recommended: Life Sciences 2, 3, and 23L, or 7A. Structure of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids; enzyme catalysis and principles of metabolism, including glycolysis, citric acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. P/NP or letter grading.

153AH. Biochemistry: Introduction to Structure, Enzymes, and Metabolism (Honors). (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisite: course 14D or 30B, with grade of C- or better. Recommended: Life Sciences 2, 3, 23L. Honors course parallel to course 153A. P/NP or letter grading.

153B. Biochemistry: DNA, RNA, and Protein Synthesis. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisite: course 153A or 153AH. Recommended: Life Sciences 2, 3, and 23L, or 7A and 7B. Nucleotide metabolism; DNA replication; DNA repair; transcription machinery; regulation of transcription; RNA structure and processing; protein synthesis and processing. P/NP or letter grading.

153BH. Biochemistry: DNA, RNA, and Protein Synthesis (Honors). (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Enforced requisites: course 153A or 153AH, Life Sciences 2, 3, 23L. Honors course parallel to course 153B. P/NP or letter grading.

153C. Biochemistry: Biosynthetic and Energy Metabolism and Its Regulation. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisite: course 153A or 153AH. Metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, amino acids, and lipids; photosynthetic metabolism and assimilation of inorganic nutrients; regulation of these processes. P/NP or letter grading.

153CH. Biochemistry: Biosynthetic and Energy Metabolism and Its Regulation (Honors). (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Requisite: course 153A or 153AH. Honors course parallel to course 153C. P/NP or letter grading.

153D. Introduction to Protein Structural Biology. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: course 153A, Life Sciences 3 or 7A. Proteins are diverse set of macromolecules that perform critical functions within cells, ranging from enzymes that catalyze metabolic reactions to proteins that enable pathogens to cause disease. Introduction to field of protein structural biology, that seeks to understand molecular basis of protein function through visualizing atomic structures and by investigating how alterations in protein structure affects function. Students gain fundamental understanding of protein structure and its relationship to function and learn how experimental and computational methods are used to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins. Hands-on training in computer graphics programs and online tools used to visualize and analyze protein structures. Letter grading.

153L. Biochemical Methods I. (4) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Requisites: courses 14BL or 20L and 30AL, and 153A or 153AH (may be taken concurrently), with grades of C- or better. Integrated term-long project involving biofuel production in bacteria. Purification of key enzyme for alcohol production from bacteria via affinity chromatography. Assessment of protein amount, purity, and activity of enzyme. Techniques include protein determination by Bradford assay, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and enzyme activity assays to determine enzyme activity (Km, Vmax, inhibitor studies). P/NP or letter grading.

154. Biochemical Methods II. (5) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 153A or 153AH, 153B or 153BH, and 153L, with grades of C- or better. Recommended: course 156. Two to three major laboratory projects using biochemical laboratory techniques to investigate contemporary problems in biochemistry. Topics include transcription activation, molecular basis of DNA-protein interactions, biochemical basis of platelet activation, and initiation of blood clotting cascade. Experiments entail characterizing function of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids involved in these processes. P/NP or letter grading.

C155. Mitochondria in Medicine, Biology, and Chemistry. (1) Seminar, two hours every other week. Open to undergraduate and graduate science majors considering or currently conducting research in areas related to mitochondria. Large number of physiological and pathophysiological processes involve mitochondrial function and dysfunction. Focus on understanding how mitochondria metabolism, form, and function impact health and disease. Physiology and cell biology of healthy and dysfunctional mitochondria critically assessed at subcellular, cellular, tissue, and organismal levels. Topics include in-depth analyses of literature and critical evaluation of experimental design and methods of current research. May be repeated for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course CM255. P/NP grading.

156. Physical Biochemistry. (4) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 110A, 153A. Biochemical kinetics; solution thermodynamics of biochemical systems; multiple equilibria; hydrodynamics; energy levels, spectroscopy, and bonding; topics from structural, statistical, and electrochemical methods of biochemistry. P/NP or letter grading.

C159. Mechanisms of Gene Regulation. (4) (Formerly numbered C159A.) Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 153B. RNA polymerase structures and mechanisms; promoter recognition and transcription cycle; mechanisms of activation; transcriptional poising and elongation control; Mediator of transcription; chromatin remodeling and modification; epigenetic regulation; cotranscriptional and transcription-coupled RNA processing; impact of transcription on mRNA processing and stability; nuclear export of mRNA. Concurrently scheduled with course CM259. P/NP or letter grading.

CM160A. Introduction to Bioinformatics. (4) (Same as Computer Science CM121.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours. Requisites: Computer Science 32 or Program in Computing 10C with grade of C- or better, and one course from Biostatistics 100A, Civil Engineering 110, Electrical Engineering 131A, Mathematics 170A, or Statistics 100A. Prior knowledge of biology not required. Designed for engineering students as well as students from biological sciences and medical school. Introduction to bioinformatics and methodologies, with emphasis on concepts and inventing new computational and statistical techniques to analyze biological data. Focus on sequence analysis and alignment algorithms. Concurrently scheduled with course CM260A. P/NP or letter grading.

CM160B. Algorithms in Bioinformatics. (4) (Same as Computer Science CM122.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours. Requisites: Computer Science 32 or Program in Computing 10C with grade of C- or better, and one course from Biostatistics 100A, Civil Engineering 110, Electrical Engineering 131A, Mathematics 170A, or Statistics 100A. Course CM160A is not requisite to CM160B. Designed for engineering students as well as students from biological sciences and medical school. Development and application of computational approaches to biological questions, with focus on formulating interdisciplinary problems as computational problems and then solving these problems using algorithmic techniques. Computational techniques include those from statistics and computer science. Concurrently scheduled with course CM260B. Letter grading.

C161A. Plant Biochemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Requisites: courses 153C and 153L. Introduction to distinctive features of plant biochemistry. Topics include photosynthesis, nitrogen metabolism, plant cell wall metabolism, and secondary metabolism in relation to stress. Concurrently scheduled with course C261A. P/NP or letter grading.

C163. Membrane Protein Structure and Function. (4) Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisite: course 156. Detailed examination of how various membrane proteins work. Topics include lipid bilayer properties and how they affect membrane protein function and biology; membrane protein biogenesis; principles of transport across membranes; how channels, transporters, and receptors work at atomic level. Emphasis on reading and analyzing original research papers. Concurrently scheduled with course C263. P/NP or letter grading.

C164. Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine. (2 to 4) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 153A and either 153B or 153C, with grades of C- or better. Biochemical reactivity of dioxygen, its role in mitochondrial metabolism, neurodegenerative diseases, apoptosis, and aging. Discussion of radical reactions, how they are harnessed to achieve enzyme catalysis, and how free radicals contribute to or regulate essential biological processes. These same reactions “run amok” under certain types of stress and can contribute to wide variety of diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Huntington’s, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s diseases), mitochondrial diseases, atherosclerosis, and aging. Concurrently scheduled with course C264. P/NP or letter grading.

C165. Metabolic Control by Protein Modification. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 153A, 153B, 153C. Biochemical basis of controlling metabolic pathways by posttranslational modification of proteins, including phosphorylation and methylation reactions. Concurrently scheduled with course C265. Letter grading.

166. RNA Structure, Recognition, and Function. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 153A, 153B, Life Sciences 3 and 23L, or 7A. Recent years have seen explosion in biochemical characterization of diverse structures and functions of RNA molecules in metabolism of living systems. RNA has been shown to act both as catalyst in living systems and as potent modulator of gene expression control at every level of gene expression pathways (transcription, RNA processing, translation, degradation). RNA molecules now being used as therapeutic agents in gene therapy approaches. Coverage of these various aspects and in-depth analysis of RNA structure and function, using primary research literature and analysis of molecular structures of RNA and RNA-protein complexes. Letter grading.

CM170. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Photosynthetic Apparatus. (2 to 4) (Same as Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology M170.) Lecture, two to three hours; discussion, zero to two hours. Requisites: courses 153A and 153B, or Life Sciences 3 and 23L, and course 153L. Recommended: courses 153C, 154, Life Sciences 4. Light harvesting, photochemistry, electron transfer, carbon fixation, carbohydrate metabolism, pigment synthesis in chloroplasts and bacteria. Assembly of photosynthetic membranes and regulation of genes encoding those components. Emphasis on understanding of experimental approaches. Concurrently scheduled with course C270. P/NP or letter grading.

171. Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 30B with grade of C- or better. Chemical bonding; structure and bonding in solid state; main group, transition metal, lanthanide and actinide compounds and reactions; catalysis, spectroscopy, special topics. P/NP or letter grading.

172. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 171 with grade of C- or better. Systematic approach to modern inorganic chemistry, structure and bonding of inorganic molecules and solids, structure/reactivity relationships, vibrational spectra of complexes, electronic structure and ligand-field theory, mechanisms of inorganic reactions, bonding and spectroscopy of organometallic compounds, transition metals in catalysis and biology. P/NP or letter grading.

C173. Electrochemical Systems. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Requisites: course 110A, Mathematics 33B. Introduction to principles of electrochemical systems commonly applied in research of inorganic chemistry, materials sciences, and nanotechnology. With examples in recent literature and discussions of experimental practice, focus on qualitative and quantitative evaluation of information obtained from electrochemical characterization methods. Understanding of course contents helps appreciate research and technologies in catalysis, energy storage and conversion, and advanced environmental technologies. Concurrently scheduled with course C273. P/NP or letter grading.

C174. Inorganic and Metalorganic Laboratory Methods. (5) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 30CL and 171, with grades of C- or better. Synthesis of inorganic compounds, including air-sensitive materials; Schlenck techniques; chromatographic and ion exchange methods; spectroscopic characterization and literature applications. Concurrently scheduled with course C274. P/NP or letter grading.

C175. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 110A, 110B, 113A, and 172, with grades of C- or better. Survey of inorganic reactions; mechanistic principles; electronic structure of metal ions; transition-metal coordination chemistry; inner- and outer-sphere and chelate complexes; substitution, isomerization, and racemization reactions; stereochemistry; oxidation/reduction, free/radical, polymerization, and photochemical reactions of inorganic species. May be concurrently scheduled with course C275. P/NP or letter grading.

C176. Group Theory and Applications to Inorganic Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 113A and 172, with grades of C- or better. Group theoretical methods; molecular orbital theory; ligand-field theory; electronic spectroscopy; vibrational spectroscopy. May be concurrently scheduled with course C276A. P/NP or letter grading.

C179. Biological Inorganic Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 153A (or 153AH), 171. Role of metal ions in biology. Topics include interactions of metal ions with proteins, nucleic acids, and other biological molecules; mechanisms of metal ion transport and storage; introduction to metalloenzyme; metalloproteins in electron transfer, respiration, and photosynthesis; metals in medicine. Concurrently scheduled with course C279. P/NP or letter grading.

C180. Solid-State Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 172 with grade of C- or better. Survey of new materials and methods for their preparation and characterization, with emphasis on band theory and its relationship to chemical, optical, transport, and magnetic properties, leading to deeper understanding of these materials. Concurrently scheduled with course C280. P/NP or letter grading.

C181. Polymer Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 30B, 110A. Synthesis of organic and inorganic macromolecules, thermodynamic and statistical mechanical descriptions of unique properties of polymers, polymer characterization methods, and special topics such as conductive and biomedical polymers and polymeric reagents in synthesis. Concurrently scheduled with course C281. P/NP or letter grading.

184. Chemical Instrumentation. (5) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 30CL and 110A, with grades of C- or better. Theory and practice of instrumental techniques of chemical and structural analysis, including atomic absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, polarography, X-ray fluorescence, and other modern methods. P/NP or letter grading.

185. Materials Chemistry Laboratory. (5) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Requisites: courses 30AL, 110A, 113A, 171. Materials synthesis and physical properties of complex materials. Combines synthetic skills with fundamental physical understanding and characterization in approximately equal proportions to relate materials synthesis to materials function. Letter grading.

M186. Stochastic Processes in Biochemical Systems. (4) (Same as Computational and Systems Biology M175.) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: Life Sciences 1, 2, 3, and 4, or 7A, 7B, and 7C, 30B or Mathematics 33B, Electrical and Computer Engineering 131A or Mathematics 170A or Statistics 100A. Covers random and stochastic processes in play in biochemical systems, including ion channels, cytoskeleton, cell migration and mitosis, gene expression networks, and signal transduction. Covers mathematical tools such as continuous and discrete Markov processes, first passage, time escape problems, statistical mechanics, and information theory. Letter grading.

189. Advanced Honors Seminars. (1) Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

189HC. Honors Contracts. (1) Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to upper-division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

192A-192B. Undergraduate Practicum in Chemistry and Biochemistry. (4-4) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours; workshop, two hours. Enforced requisites: courses 14BL and 14CL, or 20L and 30AL, or Science Education 100SL. Intended for students who are planning careers in secondary science chemistry teaching. Complements service learning California Teach science courses that involve teaching field experiences in middle school and high school classrooms. Examination of chemistry issues such as chemical storage and use, waste management, laboratory organization, safety, and techniques. P/NP or letter grading.

192C-192D. Undergraduate Assistant Education Practicum in Chemistry and Biochemistry. (4-2) Seminar, one hour; assigned setting, six hours (course 192C) or five hours (course 192D). Limited to juniors/seniors. Training and supervised practicum for advanced undergraduate students to assist in chemistry and biochemistry lectures. Students assist in preparation of materials and development of innovative programs under guidance of faculty members and teaching assistants. May not be applied toward course requirements for any departmental major. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Individual contract required. Information and contracts may be obtained from department. P/NP grading.

193A. Journal Club Seminars: UC LEADS and MARC. (2) Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors in undergraduate research training programs such as UC LEADS and MARC or those who have strong commitment to pursue graduate studies in natural sciences, engineering, or mathematics. Weekly reading and oral presentations of research or research papers selected from current literature. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

193B. Journal Club Seminars: Chemistry and Biochemistry. (2) Seminar, three hours. Limited to undergraduate students. Discussion of readings selected from current literature in particular field. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

194. Research Group Seminars: Chemistry and Biochemistry. (1) Seminar, three hours. Designed for undergraduate students who are part of research group. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in physical, organic, or inorganic chemistry or biochemistry. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

196A. Research Apprenticeship in Chemistry and Biochemistry. (2 to 4) Tutorial, three hours per week per unit. Limited to juniors/seniors. Entry-level research apprenticeship for upper-division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Consult department for additional information regarding requirements, enrollment petitions, and written proposal deadlines. May be repeated for maximum of 8 units. Individual contract required. P/NP grading.

196B. Research Apprenticeship in Chemistry and Biochemistry. (2 to 4) Tutorial, three hours per week per unit. Enforced requisite: course 196A (8 units). Limited to juniors/seniors. Research apprenticeship for upper-division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Consult department for additional information regarding requirements, enrollment petitions, and written proposal deadlines. May be taken for maximum of 4 units. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

199. Directed Research in Chemistry and Biochemistry. (2 to 4) Tutorial, three hours per week per unit. Enforced requisite: course 196A (8 units). Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating report required. May be repeated for maximum of 12 units. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.