Chemistry and Biochemistry Graduate Courses

C200. Genomics and Computational Biology. (5) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction for biochemistry students of technologies and experimental data of genomics, as well as computational tools for analyzing them. Biochemistry and molecular biology dissected life into its component parts, one gene at time, but lacked integrative mechanisms for putting this information back together to predict what happens in complete organism (e.g., over 80 percent of drug candidates fail in clinical trials). High-throughput technologies such as sequencing, microarrays, mass-spec, and robotics have given biologists incredible new capabilities to analyze complete genomes, expression patterns, functions, and interactions across whole organisms, populations, and species. Use and analysis of such datasets becomes essential daily activity for biomedical scientists. Core principles and methodologies for analyzing genomics data to answer biological and medical questions, with focus on concepts that guide data analysis rather than algorithm details. Concurrently scheduled with course C100. S/U or letter grading.

201. Scientific Proposal Writing. (2) Lecture, three hours. Designed for graduate biochemistry and molecular biology students. How to write scientific proposals to be submitted to funding agencies. How to develop curricula vitae, put together grant proposals, and critique proposals. Letter grading.

203B. Ethics in Chemical Research. (2) Seminar, one hour. Discussion of ethics in graduate education, teaching, and chemical research, including issues such as conflicts of interest, plagiarism, intellectual property, sexual harassment, and other topics related to ethical conduct of research. S/U grading.

203C. Research Integrity and Ethics in Genetics Research. (2) Lecture, 90 minutes. Data analysis and management, statistical methods, use of commercial reagents, microscopy data analysis, figure preparation, authorship, mentoring, human subjects protection, animal subject protection, and conflict of interest. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

203D. Advanced Topics in Responsible Conduct in Cellular and Molecular Biology Research. (2) Seminar, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 203A or 203B or 203C. Cellular and molecular biology PhD students continue to learn how to conduct research in field to reliably advance knowledge while maintaining ethical principles. Designed to be taken in fourth or fifth year of PhD work where students would have already been exposed to many challenges of performing and reporting experiments and who are in stage of their careers where they are beginning to think of applying for postdoctoral fellowships and research and teaching positions. Course helps fulfill training requirement in research integrity for NIH training grants and individual NRSA awards. S/U grading.

204. Student Research Seminar. (2) Seminar, one hour. Limited to students supported by UCLA program in Cellular and Molecular Biology Predoctoral Training. Research seminar presented by second- and third-year students. S/U grading.

CM205A. Introduction to Chemistry of Biology. (4) (Same as Pharmacology M205A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to chemical biology. Topics include computational chemical biology, utility of synthesis in biochemical research, peptidomimetics, designed reagents for cellular imaging, natural product biosynthesis, protein engineering and directed evolution, cell biology of metal ions, imaging metal ions in cells, metal-containing drugs. Concurrently scheduled with course C105. Letter grading.

M205B. Issues on Chemistry/Biology Interface. (2) (Same as Pharmacology M205B.) Seminar, one hour. Requisite: course CM205A. Selected talks and papers presented by training faculty on solving problems and utilizing tools in chemistry and molecular biology on chemistry/biology interface (CBI). S/U grading.

206. Chemistry of Biology Seminar. (2) Seminar, three hours. Limited to students supported by UCLA program in Chemistry/Biology Interface Predoctoral Training. Current research topics at interface of chemistry and biology. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

C207. Organometallic Chemistry. (4) (Formerly numbered 207.) Lecture/discussion, three hours. Requisite or corequisite: course 172. Survey of synthesis, structure, and reactivity (emphasizing mechanistic approach) of compounds containing carbon bonded to elements selected from main group metals, metalloids, and transition metals, including olefin complexes and metal carbonyls; applications in catalysis and organic synthesis. Concurrently scheduled with course C107. S/U or letter grading.

C208. Mass Spectrometry for Chemists and Biochemists. (2) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Requisite: course 153A. Introduction to principles and practice of organic and inorganic mass spectrometry. Topics include EI, CI, ICPMS, GC/MS, LC/MS, ESI, MALDI, MS/MS protein identification, and proteomics. Concurrently scheduled with course C108. S/U or letter grading.

209. Introduction to Chemistry Research. (2) Seminar, two hours. Half-hour presentations each session by three different chemistry professors to introduce their research programs. S/U grading.

210. Advanced Topics in Chemical Research. (2) Seminar, one hour. Designed for second-year graduate students to help them engage contemporary challenges in chemical research and their own research projects. Building of critical thinking skills and proposal writing skills. S/U grading.

C213B. Physical Chemistry: Molecular Spectroscopy. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; tutorial, one hour. Requisite: course 113A. Interaction of radiation with matter, microwave spectroscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, vibrations in polyatomic molecules, electronic spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Concurrently scheduled with course C113B. Independent study project required of graduate students. S/U or letter grading.

C215A-C215B. Quantum Chemistry: Methods. (4-4) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: course 113A, Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, with grades of C- or better. Recommended: knowledge of differential equations equivalent to Mathematics 134 or 135 or Physics 131 and of analytic mechanics equivalent to Physics 105A. Course C215A or Physics 115B with grade of C- or better is requisite to C215B. Students entering course C215A are normally expected to take course C215B in following term. Designed for chemistry students with serious interest in quantum chemistry. Postulates and systematic development of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics; expansion theorems; wells; oscillators; angular momentum; hydrogen atom; matrix techniques; approximation methods; time dependent problems; atoms; spectroscopy; magnetic resonance; chemical bonding. May be concurrently scheduled with courses C115A-C115B. S/U or letter grading.

C215C. Advanced Quantum Chemistry: Applications. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course C215B. Topics in quantum chemistry selected from molecular structure, collision processes, theory of solids, symmetry and its applications, and theory of electromagnetic radiation. Concurrently scheduled with course C115C. S/U or letter grading.

215D. Molecular Spectra, Diffraction, and Structure. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: course C215B, Physics 131. Selected topics from electronic spectra of atoms and molecules; vibrational, rotational, and Raman spectra; magnetic resonance spectra; X-ray, neutron, and electron diffraction; coherence effects. S/U or letter grading.

218. Chemistry Student Exit Seminar. (2) Seminar, two hours. Seminars presented by staff, outside speakers, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

219A. Seminars: Research in Physical Chemistry — Photon Resolved Spectroscopy of Materials (Physical Chemistry). (2) Seminar, three hours. Limited to chemistry graduate students. Discussion of recent progress in area of photon resolved spectroscopies, with focus on materials and biophysics applications. Literature discussion, discussion of recent results, safety procedures, and guest lectures. S/U grading.

219E-219Z. Seminars: Research in Physical Chemistry. (2 each) Seminar, three hours. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in physical chemistry. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. S/U grading. 219E. Dynamics of Molecule-Molecule and Molecule-Surface Reactions. 219I. Spectroscopy of Isolated Molecules, Complexes, and Clusters. 219J. Chemistry and Biophysics of Interfaces. 219K. Statistical Mechanics of Disordered Systems. 219L. Modern Methods for Molecular Reactions and Structure. 219Q. Ultrafast Studies of Chemical Reaction Dynamics in Condensed Phase. 219R. Kinetic, Thermodynamic, and Interfacial Effects in Materials. 219S. Nanoscience. 219T. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy in Biology. 219U. Theory and Applications of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Imaging. 219V. Complex Fluids: Composition, Structure, and Rheology. 219W. Biophysics and Statistical Mechanics of Soft Matter. 219X. Dynamic Processes in Chemically Reacting Flow Systems. 219Y. Theory and Computation for Materials. 219Z. Single-Cell Physiology.

221A-221Z. Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry. (2 to 4 each) Lecture, two to four hours. Each course encompasses one recognized specialty in physical chemistry, generally taught by faculty members whose research interests embrace that specialty. S/U or letter grading.

C222. Mathematical Methods for Chemistry. (4) Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisites: Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B. Review of basic mathematics necessary to study physical chemistry at graduate level, with focus on review of vectors, linear algebra, elementary complex analysis, and solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. Development of problem-solving skills through homework based on these mathematical techniques, with examples from physical chemistry. Concurrently scheduled with course C122. S/U or letter grading.

C223A-C223B. Classical and Statistical Thermodynamics. (4-4) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 110B or 156. Recommended: course 113A. Presentation of fundamentals of classical thermodynamics. Principles of statistical thermodynamics: probability, ensembles, partition functions, independent molecules, and perfect gas. Applications of classical and statistical thermodynamics selected from diatomic and polyatomic gases, solid and fluid states, phase equilibria, electric and magnetic effects, ortho-para hydrogen, chemical equilibria, reaction rates, imperfect gas, nonelectrolyte and electrolyte solutions, surface phenomena, high polymers, gravitation. May be concurrently scheduled with courses C123A-C123B. S/U or letter grading.

M223C. Nonequilibrium Statistical Mechanics and Molecular Biophysics. (4) (Same as Physics M215D.) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses C215B and C223B, or Physics 215A. Fundamentals of nonequilibrium thermodynamics and statistical mechanics applied to molecular biophysics. S/U or letter grading.

225. Chemical Kinetics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses C215B, C223B. Classical experimental and theoretical approaches to study of rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions. Modern experimental techniques and molecular-level theory of reaction dynamics. Examples of well-studied elementary reactions. S/U or letter grading.

C226A. Computational Methods for Chemists. (4) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, four hours. Preparation: programming experience in either BASIC, Fortran, C, C++, Java, or Pascal. Requisites: courses 110A, 113A, Mathematics 33A. Theoretical, numerical, and programming tools for constructing new chemical applications, including simple force fields and resulting statistical mechanics for simple molecules, simple ab-initio methods for organic molecules and nanotubes, and classical dynamics and spectroscopy. Concurrently scheduled with course C126A. S/U or letter grading.

CM227. Synthetic Biology for Biofuels. (4) (Same as Chemical Engineering CM227.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 153A. Engineering microorganisms for complex phenotype is common goal of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Production of advanced biofuels involves designing and constructing novel metabolic networks in cells. Such efforts require profound understanding of biochemistry, protein structure, and biological regulations and are aided by tools in bioinformatics, systems biology, and molecular biology. Fundamentals of metabolic biochemistry, protein structure and function, and bioinformatics. Use of systems modeling for metabolic networks to design microorganisms for energy applications. Concurrently scheduled with course CM127. S/U or letter grading.

228. Chemical Physics Seminar. (2) Seminar, two hours. Seminars presented by staff, outside speakers, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

229. Introduction to Physical Chemistry Research. (2) Lecture, 90 minutes. Designed primarily for entering graduate physical chemistry students. S/U grading.

M230B. Structural Molecular Biology. (4) (Same as Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology M230B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: Mathematics 3C, Physics 6C. Selected topics from principles of biological structure; structures of globular proteins and RNAs; structures of fibrous proteins, nucleic acids, and polysaccharides; harmonic analysis and Fourier transforms; principles of electron, neutron, and X-ray diffraction; optical and computer filtering; three-dimensional reconstruction. S/U or letter grading.

M230D. Structural Molecular Biology Laboratory. (2) (Same as Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology M230D.) Laboratory, 10 hours. Corequisite: course M230B. Methods in structural molecular biology, including experiments utilizing single crystal X-ray diffraction, low angle X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, optical diffraction, optical filtering, three-dimensional reconstruction from electron micrographs, and model building. S/U or letter grading.

235A-235R. Seminars: Research in Organic Chemistry. (2 each) Seminar/research group meeting, three hours. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in organic chemistry. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. S/U grading. 235E. Theoretical and Physical Organic Chemistry. 235F. Synthetic Methods and Synthesis of Natural Products. 235G. Organometallic Chemistry and Organic Synthesis. 235I. Fullerene Chemistry and Materials Science. 235K. Organic Chemistry in Organized and Restricted Media. 235N. Target- and Diversity-Oriented Synthesis of Natural Products and Product-Like Molecules. 235O. Polymer Chemistry and Biomaterials. 235P . Reaction Discovery and Total Synthesis of Complex Molecules. 235Q. Synthetic Organic Chemistry Research. 235R. Fluorous Materials, Synthetic Chemistry, and Supermolecular Assembly.

236. Spectroscopic Methods of Organic Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite or corequisite: course C243A. Problem solving using proton and carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry; new techniques in NMR, IR, and MS, with emphasis on Fourier transform NMR. S/U or letter grading.

C240. Bionanotechnology. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 30C, 110A. Basic physical, chemical, and biological principles in bionanotechnology; materials and strategies for top-down and bottom-up fabrication of ordered biologically derived molecules, characterization and detection techniques, and biomimetic materials and applications at nanoscale. Concurrently scheduled with course C140. S/U or letter grading.

241A-241Z. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry. (2 to 4 each) Lecture, two to four hours. Requisite or corequisite: course C243A. Each course encompasses one recognized specialty in organic chemistry, generally taught by faculty members whose research interests embrace that specialty. S/U or letter grading.

C243A. Structure and Mechanism in Organic Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 30C and 30CL (may be taken concurrently), 110B, and 113A, with grades of C- or better. Mechanisms of organic reactions. Acidity and acid catalysis; linear free energy relationships; isotope effects. Molecular orbital theory; photochemistry; pericyclic reactions. May be concurrently scheduled with course C143A. S/U or letter grading.

C243B. Organic Chemistry: Mechanism and Structure. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course C243A. Mechanisms of organic reactions; structure and detection of reactive intermediates. May be concurrently scheduled with course C143B. S/U or letter grading.

244A. Organic Synthesis: Methodology and Stereochemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Modern synthetic reactions and transformations involving organic substrates. Special emphasis on regents useful in asymmetric induction and stereoselective synthesis of structurally complex target molecules. S/U or letter grading.

244B. Strategy and Design in Organic Synthesis. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite or corequisite: course C243A. Theory behind planning of syntheses of complex molecules from simpler ones. Organic reactions and their use in synthetic process. Reasoning and art involved in organic synthesis. S/U or letter grading.

C245. Theoretical and Computational Organic Chemistry. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; computer laboratory, one hour. Requisites: courses 30C, 113A. Applications of quantum mechanical concepts and methods to understand and predict organic structures and reactivities. Computational modeling methods, including laboratory experience with force-field and quantum mechanical computer calculations. Concurrently scheduled with course C145. S/U or letter grading.

247. Organic Colloquium. (2) Seminar, two hours. Seminars in organic chemistry and related areas presented by staff, outside speakers, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

248. Organic Chemistry Student Seminar. (2) Seminar, two hours. Seminars presented by staff, outside speakers, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students. Strongly recommended for first- and second-year organic chemistry graduate students. Presentation required if taken for letter grade. S/U or letter grading.

249A. Methods of Materials Chemistry: Synthesis, Characterization, Physical Properties, Applications, and Devices. (2) Seminar, two hours. Designed for first-year graduate students to teach advanced problem-solving skills and critical thinking, with focus on problems and recent literature pertaining to materials chemistry. How materials are synthesized and characterized. Discussion of important physical properties, as well as broad range of applications and behavior in devices. S/U grading.

249B. Methods of Chemical Synthesis: Organic/Inorganic/Organometallic. (2) Seminar, two hours. Designed for first-year graduate students to teach advanced problem-solving skills and critical thinking, with focus on problems and recent literature pertaining to chemical synthesis of organic, inorganic, and organometallic compounds. S/U grading.

249C. Methods of Physical/Theoretical/Biophysical Chemistry. (2) Seminar, two hours. Designed for first-year graduate students to teach advanced problem-solving skills and critical thinking, with focus on problems and recent literature pertaining to physical, theoretical, and biophysical chemistry. S/U grading.

C250. Research Methods and Integrity in Cellular and Molecular Biology. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Data analysis and management, statistical methods, use of antibody and kit reagents, figure preparation, authorship, mentoring, human subjects protection, animal subject protection, and conflict of interest. May be repeated for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C150. Letter grading.

CM255. Mitochondria in Medicine, Biology, and Chemistry. (1) (Same as Biological Chemistry M255.) Seminar, two hours every other week. Open to undergraduate and graduate science majors considering or currently conducting research in areas related to mitochondria. Large number of physiological and pathophysiological processes involve mitochondrial function and dysfunction. Focus on understanding how mitochondria metabolism, form, and function impact health and disease. Physiology and cell biology of healthy and dysfunctional mitochondria critically assessed at subcellular, cellular, tissue, and organismal levels. Topics include in-depth analyses of literature and critical evaluation of experimental design and methods of current research. May be repeated for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C155. S/U grading.

256A-256Z. Seminars: Research in Biochemistry. (2 each) Seminar, three hours. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in biochemistry. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. S/U grading. 256B. Biochemistry of Protein Function. 256D. Transcriptional Control Mechanisms in Drosophila Embryogenesis. 256F. Current Topics in Prokaryotic Development. 256G. Nucleic Acid Structure Determination by NMR. 256J. Contractile Proteins in Muscle Contraction and Cell Motility. 256K. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Chlamydomonas. 256L. Literature of Structural Biology. 256N. Advanced Topics in Structural Biology. 256O. Membrane Biophysics. 256P. Analysis of Protein Structure. 256Q. Biochemistry and Function of Ubiquinone in Yeast and Higher Eukaryotes. 256R. Biomolecular Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Protein Structure. 256S. Proteome Bioinformatics. 256T. RNA Processing and RNA Genomics. 256U. Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Link to Disease. 256V. Proteomics and Mass Spectrometry. 256W. Cytoskeletal Dynamics during Drosophila Oogenesis. 256X. Microtubule-Based Structures and Human Disease. 256Y. Research in Genomics: Biochemistry, Synthetic Biology, and Genomics. 256Z. Information Processing and Intercellular Signaling Networks.

257. Physical Chemistry of Biological Macromolecules. (4) Lecture, one hour; discussion, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Requisite: course 153A. Theory of hydrodynamic, thermodynamic, and optical techniques used to study structure and function of biological macromolecules. S/U or letter grading.

258. Advanced Topics in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. (2) Lecture, two hours. Critical analysis of experimental design and methods in biochemistry and molecular biology. In-depth analysis of literature in one or more areas of current research. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

CM259. Mechanisms of Gene Regulation. (4) (Formerly numbered C259A.) (Same as Biological Chemistry M259.) Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 153B. RNA polymerase structures and mechanisms; promoter recognition and transcription cycle; mechanisms of activation; transcriptional poising and elongation control; Mediator of transcription; chromatin remodeling and modification; epigenetic regulation; cotranscriptional and transcription-coupled RNA processing; impact of transcription on mRNA processing and stability; nuclear export of mRNA. Concurrently scheduled with course C159. S/U or letter grading.

CM260A. Introduction to Bioinformatics. (4) (Same as Bioinformatics M221, Computer Science CM221, and Human Genetics M260A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours. Requisites: Computer Science 32 or Program in Computing 10C with grade of C- or better, and one course from Biostatistics 100A, 110A, Civil Engineering 110, Electrical Engineering 131A, Mathematics 170A, or Statistics 100A. Prior knowledge of biology not required. Designed for engineering students as well as students from biological sciences and medical school. Introduction to bioinformatics and methodologies, with emphasis on concepts and inventing new computational and statistical techniques to analyze biological data. Focus on sequence analysis and alignment algorithms. Concurrently scheduled with course CM160A. S/U or letter grading.

CM260B. Algorithms in Bioinformatics. (4) (Same as Bioinformatics M222 and Computer Science CM222.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours. Requisites: Computer Science 32 or Program in Computing 10C with grade of C- or better, and one course from Biostatistics 100A, Civil Engineering 110, Electrical Engineering 131A, Mathematics 170A, or Statistics 100A. Course CM260A is not requisite to CM260B. Designed for engineering students as well as students from biological sciences and medical school. Development and application of computational approaches to biological questions, with focus on formulating interdisciplinary problems as computational problems and then solving these problems using algorithmic techniques. Computational techniques include those from statistics and computer science. Concurrently scheduled with course CM160B. Letter grading.

260BL. Advanced Bioinformatics Computational Laboratory. (2) Laboratory, four hours. Enforced requisite: course CM260A. Corequisite: course CM260B. Development and application of computational approaches to ask and answer biological questions by implementing variety of bioinformatics and systems biology algorithms. Advantages and disadvantages of different algorithmic methods for studying biological questions and preliminary understanding of how to compute statistical significance of results. Development of conceptual understanding of implementation of bioinformatics algorithms and foundation for how to do innovative work in these fields. Experience in observing impact of computational complexity of algorithms in computing solutions. S/U or letter grading.

C261A. Plant Biochemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Requisites: courses 153C and 153L. Introduction to distinctive features of plant biochemistry. Topics include photosynthesis, nitrogen metabolism, plant cell wall metabolism, and secondary metabolism in relation to stress. Concurrently scheduled with course C161A. S/U or letter grading.

262. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Protein Translocation Systems. (3) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Requisites: courses 269A through 269D. Protein translocation into nucleus, mitochondrion, peroxisome, chloroplast, endoplasmic reticulum, and protein export in bacteria. Letter grading.

C263. Membrane Protein Structure and Function. (4) Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisite: course 156. Detailed examination of how various membrane proteins work. Topics include lipid bilayer properties and how they affect membrane protein function and biology; membrane protein biogenesis; principles of transport across membranes; how channels, transporters, and receptors work at atomic level. Emphasis on reading and analyzing original research papers. Concurrently scheduled with course C163. S/U or letter grading.

C264. Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine. (2 to 4) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 153A and either 153B or 153C, with grades of C- or better. Biochemical reactivity of dioxygen, its role in mitochondrial metabolism, neurodegenerative diseases, apoptosis, and aging. Discussion of radical reactions, how they are harnessed to achieve enzyme catalysis, and how free radicals contribute to or regulate essential biological processes. These same reactions “run amok” under certain types of stress and can contribute to wide variety of diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Huntington’s, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s diseases), mitochondrial diseases, atherosclerosis, and aging. Concurrently scheduled with course C164. S/U or letter grading.

C265. Metabolic Control by Protein Modification. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 153A, 153B, 153C. Biochemical basis of controlling metabolic pathways by posttranslational modification of proteins, including phosphorylation and methylation reactions. Concurrently scheduled with course C165. Letter grading.

266. Proteomics and Protein Mass Spectrometry. (4) Lecture, four hours. Essential technologies and concepts practiced in proteomics-based research, including methods for protein separation and display, protein quantitation, and protein identification. Emphasis on fundamentals of protein mass spectrometry. S/U or letter grading.

267. Nanoscience and Chemistry. (4) Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 110A, 113A, 171, 172. Designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Why nanoscience is important and interesting and critical role of chemistry in nanoscience. Chemistry and physics of variety of synthetic inorganic nanostructures, including metallic nanostructures (nanocrystals, nanorods, nanowires), semiconductor nanostructures (quantum dots/rods, nanowires, plates), and carbon nanostructures (fullerene, nanotubes, graphene). Discussion of synthetic approaches, structures, and physical properties, as well as potential technological opportunities of each. Letter grading.

268. Biochemistry Research Seminar. (2) Seminar, two hours. Seminars presented by staff, outside speakers, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students on topics of current biochemical research interest. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

269A. Protein Structure. (2) Lecture, five hours; discussion, two hours. Requisites: courses 153A, 153B, 153C, 156. Three-dimensional structure of proteins. Forces that stabilize structure of soluble and membrane proteins. Kinetics of protein folding and role of chaperones. Prediction of protein structure from sequence. Letter grading.

269B. Biocatalysis and Bioenergetics. (2) Lecture, five hours; discussion, two hours. Requisites: courses 153A, 153B, 153C, 156. Mechanisms and regulation of protein-mediated catalysis. Proteomics and metabolomics. Concepts in electron, proton, and energy transfer. Energy transducing membranes in chloroplasts and mitochondria. Letter grading.

269C. Nucleic Acid Structure and Catalysis. (2) Lecture, five hours; discussion, two hours. Requisites: courses 153A, 153B, 153C, 156. Three-dimensional structure of DNA and RNA. Sequence-specific recognition of DNA and RNA. RNA-catalyzed processes, including self-splicing and peptide bond formation. Letter grading.

269D. Mechanism and Regulation of Gene Expression. (2) Lecture, five hours; discussion, two hours. Requisites: courses 153A, 153B, 153C, 156. Mechanism and regulation of transcription in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Mechanism and regulation of mRNA processing; mRNA export and degradation. Letter grading.

269E. Biomolecular Structure, Catalysis, and Regulation. (2) Lecture, five hours; discussion, two hours. Requisites: courses 153A, 153B, 153C, 156. Protein-protein interactions, proteomics, protein networks, regulatory circuits, cellular dynamics, imaging of cellular processes. Letter grading.

C270. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Photosynthetic Apparatus. (2 to 4) Lecture, two to three hours; discussion, zero to two hours. Requisites: courses 153A and 153B, or Life Sciences 3 and 23L, and course 153L. Recommended: courses 153C, 154, Life Sciences 4. Light harvesting, photochemistry, electron transfer, carbon fixation, carbohydrate metabolism, pigment synthesis in chloroplasts and bacteria. Assembly of photosynthetic membranes and regulation of genes encoding those components. Emphasis on understanding of experimental approaches. Concurrently scheduled with course CM170. S/U or letter grading.

271. Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. (2 to 4) Lecture, two to four hours. Each offering encompasses one recognized specialty in inorganic chemistry, generally taught by faculty members whose research interests embrace that specialty. S/U or letter grading.

272A-272N. Seminars: Research in Inorganic Chemistry. (2 each) Seminar, three hours. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in inorganic chemistry. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. S/U grading. 272A. Chemistry of Materials. 272C. Inorganic Spectroscopy. 272G. Issues in Chemical Education. 272I. Organometallic Chemistry. 272K. Inorganic Nanostructures: Synthesis, Properties, and Functions. 272L. Molecular Materials. 272M. Methodology for Chemical Synthesis of Complex Molecules. 272N. Electrochemical Materials and Interfaces.

C273. Electrochemical Systems. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Introduction to principles of electrochemical systems commonly applied in research of inorganic chemistry, materials sciences, and nanotechnology. With examples in recent literature and discussions of experimental practice, focus on qualitative and quantitative evaluation of information obtained from electrochemical characterization methods. Understanding of course contents helps appreciate research and technologies in catalysis, energy storage and conversion, and advanced environmental technologies. Concurrently scheduled with course C173. S/U or letter grading.

C274. Inorganic and Metalorganic Laboratory Methods. (5) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 30CL and 171, with grades of C- or better. Synthesis of inorganic compounds, including air-sensitive materials; Schlenck techniques; chromatographic and ion exchange methods; spectroscopic characterization and literature applications. Concurrently scheduled with course C174. S/U or letter grading.

C275. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 110A, 110B, 113A, and 172, with grades of C- or better. Survey of inorganic reactions; mechanistic principles; electronic structure of metal ions; transition-metal coordination chemistry; inner- and outer-sphere and chelate complexes; substitution, isomerization, and racemization reactions; stereochemistry; oxidation/reduction, free/radical, polymerization, and photochemical reactions of inorganic species. May be concurrently scheduled with course C175. S/U or letter grading.

C276A. Group Theory and Applications to Inorganic Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 113A and 172, with grades of C- or better. Group theoretical methods; molecular orbital theory; ligand-field theory; electronic spectroscopy; vibrational spectroscopy. May be concurrently scheduled with course C176. S/U or letter grading.

276B. Physical Methods in Inorganic Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course C276A. Theory and applications of spectroscopic techniques, including magnetic resonance and vibrational and surface science methods, to inorganic compounds and materials. S/U or letter grading.

277. Crystal Structure Analysis. (4) Lecture, three hours. Theory and practice of modern crystallography, with emphasis on practical experience in structure determination. Topics include crystallographic symmetry, scattering theory, data collection, Fourier analysis, heavy atom techniques, direct methods, isomorphous replacement, crystallographic refinement, error analysis, and common pitfalls. S/U or letter grading.

278. Inorganic Chemistry Student Seminar. (2) Seminar, two hours. Seminars presented by staff, outside speakers, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

C279. Biological Inorganic Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 153A (or 153AH), 171. Role of metal ions in biology. Topics include interactions of metal ions with proteins, nucleic acids, and other biological molecules; mechanisms of metal ion transport and storage; introduction to metalloenzyme; metalloproteins in electron transfer, respiration, and photosynthesis; metals in medicine. Concurrently scheduled with course C179. S/U or letter grading.

C280. Solid-State Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 172 with grade of C- or better. Survey of new materials and methods for their preparation and characterization, with emphasis on band theory and its relationship to chemical, optical, transport, and magnetic properties, leading to deeper understanding of these materials. Concurrently scheduled with course C180. S/U or letter grading.

C281. Polymer Chemistry. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 30B, 110A. Synthesis of organic and inorganic macromolecules, thermodynamic and statistical mechanical descriptions of unique properties of polymers, polymer characterization methods, and special topics such as conductive and biomedical polymers and polymeric reagents in synthesis. Concurrently scheduled with course C181. S/U or letter grading.

282. Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry Research. (2) Lecture, 90 minutes. Discussion of current research in inorganic chemistry, designed primarily for entering graduate inorganic chemistry students. S/U grading.

283. Evolution of Devices from Concept to Product. (2) Seminar, 90 minutes. Required of students in Materials Creation Training Program. Training in fundamental science and engineering to fabricate electrical, photonic, and microelectromechanical devices. Discussion of intellectual property issues and development of business plan. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

284. Materials Creation Training Program Brown-Bag Seminar. (2) Seminar, one hour. Required of students in Materials Creation Training Program. Research and literature seminar presented by graduate students conducting research in synthesis and characterization of materials and fabrication of electronic and photonic devices. S/U grading.

285. Materials Chemistry Laboratory. (5) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Requisites: courses 30AL, 110A, 113A, 171. Materials synthesis and physical properties of complex materials. Combines synthetic skills with fundamental physical understanding and characterization in approximately equal proportions to relate materials synthesis to materials function. Letter grading.

M370A. Integrated Science Instruction Methods. (4) (Same as Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences M370A and Physics M370A.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, one hour. Preparation: one introductory lower-division year (including laboratory) each of chemistry, life sciences, and physics and at least two Earth science courses, preferably one with field experience. Classroom management, lesson design, assessment, history of science education. S/U or letter grading.

M370B. Integrated Science Instruction Methods. (4) (Same as Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences M370B and Physics M370B.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, one hour. Requisite: course M370A or Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences M370A or Physics M370A. Application of learning theory to science instruction and classroom management, including use of technology, collaborative learning, laboratory safety, ethical issues, field experiences, and professional development. S/U or letter grading.

375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum. (1 to 4) Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

400. Safety in Chemical and Biochemical Research. (2) Lecture, two hours. Survey of safe laboratory practices for experimental research in organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry and biochemistry. Topics include laser safety, cryogenic hazards, high- and low-pressure experimentation, gas and carcinogen handling, chemical spills, fire extinguishing, and chemical disposal. S/U grading.

495. Teaching College Chemistry. (2) Seminar, two hours; discussion, two hours; 20 hours training during week prior to Fall Quarter. Course for teaching assistants designed to deal with problems and techniques of teaching college chemistry. S/U grading.

596. Directed Individual Study or Research. (2 to 16) Tutorial, to be arranged with faculty member who directs study or research. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

597. Preparation for MS Comprehensive Examination or PhD Qualifying Examinations. (2 to 4) Tutorial, to be arranged. May be taken for maximum of 8 units. S/U grading.

598. Research for and Preparation of MS Thesis. (2 to 16) Tutorial, to be arranged. Each faculty member supervises research of MS students and holds research group meetings, seminars, and discussions with students. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

599. Research for and Preparation of PhD Dissertation. (2 to 16) Tutorial, to be arranged. Each faculty member supervises research of PhD students and holds research group meetings, seminars, and discussions with students. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.