Germanic Languages

German Upper-Division Courses

102. War, Politics, Art. (5) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Taught in English. Analysis of interrelationship between politics, social conditions, and arts with respect to war. World Wars I and II and German history to be used as model for principal questions of society and philosophical thinking. P/NP or letter grading.

103. German Film in Cultural Context: Early German Film. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Taught in English. Survey of German film between 1919 and 1945. Analysis of technological and stylistic development of film from silent Expressionist films to Nazi propaganda and entertainment films. Film discussions enhanced by interactive media. Letter grading.

104. German Film in Cultural Context, 1945 to Present. (4) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Taught in English. Survey of German film since 1945 in its thematic and stylistic diversity. How did German filmmakers grapple with aftermath of World War II and Holocaust, economic recovery, Cold War and division of Germany, reunification, and growth of minority communities? Film discussions enhanced by interactive media. Letter grading.

M105. Tristan, Isolde, and History of Heterosexuality. (4) (Same as Gender Studies M119.) Lecture, three hours. Taught in English. German, French, and English versions of Tristan and Isolde story from Middle Ages to 20th century. Particular attention to relation between representation of heterosexual love in each text and contemporaneous ideas about human sexuality. P/NP or letter grading.

109. Jewish Question and German Thought. (4) Lecture, three hours. Taught in English. Analysis of works that represent process of Jewish assimilation, disenfranchisement, and extermination, including authors such as Mendelssohn, Heine, Kafka, Paul Celan, Nelly Sachs, Anne Frank, and others. Letter grading.

110. Special Topics in Modern Literature and Culture. (4) Lecture, three hours. Taught in English. Content varies with instructor and may include works by authors such as Thomas Mann, Rilke, Kafka, Brecht, Christa Wolf, and others. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

111. Thomas Mann, Hesse, Böll, and Grass: German Nobel Prize Winners in English. (4) Lecture, three hours. Taught in English. Survey of Nobel Prize-winning German texts with eye for degree to which these authors’s visions reflect Nobel’s ideals of peace and progress of human race. Texts include Weavers (Hauptmann), excerpts from Buddenbrooks (Mann), and Siddharta (Hesse). Viewing of films based on Lost Honor of Katharina Blum and Tin Drum . Letter grading.

112. Feminist Issues in German Literature and Culture. (4) Lecture, three hours. Taught in English. Analysis of major issues in German feminism today (e.g., status, creative work, and reception of women writers in various periods such as Romanticism, Fascism, and/or divided/unified Germanies). Letter grading.

113. German Folklore. (4) Lecture, three hours. Taught in English. Survey of various folklore genres in cultural context, including legends, proverbs, and cultural enactments such as carnival. Letter grading.

114. Fairy Tales and Fantastic. (5) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Taught in English. History and reception of folklore collections in Europe, with particular attention to ideology and influence of Grimms’s tales. Interpretation of selected tales and their transformations and appropriation in literature, film, advertising, and pedagogy. P/NP or letter grading.

115. 19th-Century German Philosophy. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Taught in English. German philosophy, which may generally be characterized as philosophy that takes activity rather than passive subsistence to be fundamental nature of all things, is one of Germany’s greatest gifts to humanity. Exploration of first half of two-century history of German philosophy — period from Kant to Nietzsche, including Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Marx. Letter grading.

116. 20th-Century German Philosophy. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Taught in English. German philosophy, which may generally be characterized as philosophy that takes activity rather than passive subsistence to be fundamental nature of all things, is one of Germany’s greatest gifts to humanity. Exploration of second half of two-century history of German philosophy — period from Nietzsche through Habermas, including Heidegger, Gadamer, Jaspers, and Frankfurt School theorists. Letter grading.

117. German Exile Culture in Los Angeles. (4) Lecture, three hours. Taught in English. Cultural and historical exploration of exile as site of creative activity for German writers and other artists during and after World War II. General questions of cultural migration and cultural transfer to be thematized. P/NP or letter grading.

118SL. Between Memory and History: Interviewing Holocaust Survivors. (4) Seminar, two hours; fieldwork, two hours. Strongly recommended requisites: prior European and Holocaust history courses. Examination of historical value of eyewitness testimony of Holocaust through unique service opportunities that bring students together with survivors. Question of testimony approached from number of perspectives, including legal, historical, and ethical, to examine vexed relationship between history and memory. Examination of survivor testimony through classic memoirs in field, such as Primo Levi’s The Drowned and the Saved and Ruth Kluger’s Still Alive . Through collaboration with Jewish Family Services, 1939 Club, and Los Angeles Museum of Holocaust, students meet and work with Holocaust survivors and undertake collaborative research projects and oral histories. Students also research and curate series of interactive tours through Museum of Holocaust. Letter grading.

140. Language and Linguistics. (4) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite or corequisite: course 6. Taught in English with German proficiency required. Theories and methods of linguistics, with emphasis on structure of modern standard German, its phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Other topics include diachronic, spatial, and social variation of German (i.e., its historical development, dialectology, and sociolinguistic dimensions). Letter grading.

141. Current Topics in Germanic Linguistics. (4) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 152. Taught in English with German proficiency required. In-depth investigation of one topic in field of Germanic linguistics, such as phonetics and phonology, morphology and syntax, semantics and pragmatics, social and spatial variation (i.e., sociolinguistics and dialectology of German), or history of German. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

C142. Linguistic Theory and Grammatical Description. (4) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 140 or Linguistics 20. Taught in English with German proficiency required. Problems in structure of Dutch and German, considered from theoretical frameworks such as sign-oriented linguistics, functional linguistics, discourse grammar, and cognitive linguistics. Discussion of formal linguistic approaches. Concurrently scheduled with course C238. Letter grading.

150. German Play Production Act I. (5) Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisite: course 3. Taught in German. Introduction to four German plays (readings variable) and to different types of drama and drama theory. Reading, discussion, and analysis of plays in detail, practice in performing roles in class, and writing of short responses in German. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

151. German Play Production Act II. (5) Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 3 (enforced), 150. Taught in German. Staging of German play. Students responsible for various aspects of theater production, including acting and technical jobs (costumes, sets, and programs). Intensive pronunciation practice. Two public performances take place at end of term. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

152. Conversation and Composition on Contemporary German Culture and Society I. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 6. Taught in German. Structured around themes as they emerge in contemporary German texts ranging from news magazine articles to literature, with emphasis on speaking and writing proficiency. Presentation software featured. P/NP or letter grading.

153. Conversation and Composition on Contemporary German Culture and Society II. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 6. Taught in German. Structured around themes as they emerge in contemporary German texts ranging from news magazine articles to literature, with emphasis on speaking and writing proficiency. Presentation software featured. P/NP or letter grading.

154. Business German. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 6. Taught in German. Specialized language course that teaches German business administration, practices, and correspondence, with attention to cultural nuances. Ongoing developments in European Union analyzed via newspaper articles and Internet. P/NP or letter grading.

155. Advanced German Language through Cultural History and Current Affairs. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 152, 153. Taught in German. Advanced German language course that juxtaposes cultural history with current affairs to teach complex speaking and writing skills of interpretation, analysis, and criticism. Readings may include selections from Luther, Heine, Freud, and current authors. Students create their own interactive media presentations. Letter grading.

157. Contemporary German Cinema: Advanced Conversation and Composition. (4) Lecture, three hours. Taught in German. Development of advanced speaking skills and thorough grounding in essay writing in German by considering issues of style, structure, grammar, and vocabulary. Introduction to contemporary German cinema to expose students to slice of German (and European) culture and history, with focus on notion of boundary. Examination of different types of boundaries and borders (e.g., physical borders between countries; boundaries created by various political ideologies; socially created boundaries of class, race, and gender; boundary between memory and experience), ways in which people cross them, and their reasons for these transgressions. Analysis of movies to better understand various cinematic techniques. P/NP or letter grading.

158. Introduction to Study of Literature. (4) Lecture, three hours. Taught in German. Introduction to most important terms and resources of literary analysis to help students develop and improve skills in close and critical reading of literary texts, develop basic research techniques, acquire familiarity with basics of literary and cultural analysis, and find pleasure in pursuit of literary and cultural study. Letter grading.

159. German Cultural Studies. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 152 or 153. Taught in German; some theoretical readings in English. Exploration of German culture in different historical contexts. Examination of various cultural spaces, practices, and standpoints as staged in literary and nonliterary texts, with emphasis on constructions of sex and gender, memory and national identity, and ethnicity and race. Analysis of ways of seeing, thinking, and talking about these issues as manifested in several cultural debates that dominated public discussions in Germany (and Europe) for several weeks, months, or even years (e.g., debates about admission of women to universities at end of 19th century, reconstructing/preserving sites of memory in postwar Germany, and headscarf and integration in contemporary Germany). Letter grading.

160. Introduction to German Poetry. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 152 or 153. Taught in German. Close reading of representative examples of German lyric poetry from early as well as recent literary periods, including systematic consideration of poetic conventions and forms, diction, imagery, symbolism, and metrics. Letter grading.

161. Introduction to German Drama. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 152 or 153. Taught in German. Analysis of selected dramatic genres (e.g., tragedy, comedy, one-act play, lyric drama, lyric theater, historical drama, etc.), including systematic review of dramatic forms, techniques, and theories. Texts selected from both contemporary and earlier periods. Letter grading.

162. Introduction to German Narrative Prose. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 152 or 153. Taught in German. Analysis of narrative prose genres (e.g., short story, novella, fairy tales, etc.), including systematic review of narrative forms, techniques, and styles. Texts selected from both contemporary and earlier periods. Letter grading.

163. Project of Enlightenment. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 152 or 153. Taught in German. Topics in Enlightenment literature, social history, and culture. Works by Goethe, Lessing, Schiller, Kant, Mozart, and others. Letter grading.

164. Introduction to 19th-Century Studies. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 152 or 153. Taught in German. Presentation of major texts from Romanticism to realism. Works by Kleist, Büchner, Heine, Fontane, and others. Letter grading.

165. Introduction to Modern Literature. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 152 or 153. Taught in German. Analysis of selected modern works written between 1890 and 1945, including texts by authors such as Thomas Mann, Kafka, Rilke, Brecht, and others. Letter grading.

166. Introduction to Contemporary Literature. (4) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 152 or 153. Taught in German. Analysis and discussion of German, Austrian, Swiss, and ex-GDR literatures from 1945 to present. Examination of writers such as Heinrich Böll, Günther Grass, Friedrich Dürrenmatt, Elfriede Jelinek, and Christa Wolf with view to their specific political and cultural context. Letter grading.

169. Studies in German Literature before 1750. (4) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 152 or 153. Taught in German. Readings and analysis of major works from Middle Ages to baroque. Letter grading.

170. Goethe. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 152 or 153. Taught in German. Reading and discussion of representative works (except Faust ) from Goethe’s early period (Die Leiden des jungen Werther) through maturity and old age (West-östlicher Divan). Students work with digital humanities methods to improve German language competency and evaluate Goethe’s global influence on Western intellectual history. Letter grading.

171. Goethe’s Faust. (4) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 152 or 153. Taught in German. Detailed interpretation of Goethe’s major work, Parts I and II, together with general consideration of other treatments of Faust theme in European literature. Letter grading.

172. Romanticism. (4) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 152 or 153. Taught in German. Reading and analysis of major works by German Romantics, including Friedrich Schlegel, Novalis, E.T.A. Hoffman, and Eichendorff. Letter grading.

173. Advanced Study of Modern Literature. (4) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 152 or 153. Taught in German. Naturalism, Expressionism, and other early 20th-century literary movements and works. Letter grading.

174. Advanced Study of Contemporary Literature and Culture. (4) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 152 or 153. Taught in German. Literature after 1945 in German-speaking countries, including issues such as national borders, ethnic identity, gender relations, and commercialization of culture. Letter grading.

175. Intercultural Germany: Literature, Politics, Migration, and Culture. (4) Lecture, three hours. Taught in German. Most readings in German; some theoretical readings in English. Exploration of issues surrounding immigration and intercultural identity in Germany since 1960, with focus on period after 1990. Examination of various cultural spaces, practices, and standpoints as staged in literary and nonliterary texts, with emphasis on constructions of ethnicity, nation, race, class, and gender. Analysis of several political and cultural debates that dominated media and public discussions in Germany and Europe for several weeks. Discussion of several literary texts by Turkish German and other minority/intercultural writers. Examination of hip-hop minority music and culture as voices in political debates. Exploration of contemporary controversies around Islam in Germany. Reading of several theoretical pieces that examine relationships between immigration, globalization, culture, and identity. P/NP or letter grading.

187. Undergraduate Seminar. (4) Seminar, three hours. Required of all German majors who are candidates for general secondary instructional credential. Content varies by instructor and may include advanced work in folklore, film, and German studies. Letter grading.

189. Advanced Honors Seminars. (1) Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

189HC. Honors Contracts. (1) Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to upper-division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

191A. Variable Topics Research Seminars: German. (4) Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 6. Taught in German. Research seminars on topics to be announced each term. Topics include major writers, genres, cultural movements, or theoretical practices. May be repeated for credit with consent of major adviser. P/NP or letter grading.

191C. Capstone Seminar. (2) Seminar, three hours. Limited to senior German majors. Collaborative discussion of and reflection on courses already taken for major, drawing out and synthesizing larger themes and culminating in paper or other final project. Must be taken in conjunction with one course numbered 140 or higher. Letter grading.

197. Individual Studies in German. (2 to 4) Tutorial, three hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Individual intensive study, with scheduled meetings to be arranged between faculty member and student. Assigned reading and tangible evidence of mastery of subject matter required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

199. Directed Research or Senior Project in German. (4) Tutorial, three hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.