Mathematics Upper-Division Courses

General and Teacher Training

100. Problem Solving. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 31B with grade of C− or better. Problem-solving techniques and mathematical topics useful as preparation for Putnam Examination and similar competitions. Continued fractions, inequalities, modular arithmetic, closed form evaluation of sums and products, problems in geometry, rational functions and polynomials, other nonroutine problems. Participants expected to take Putnam Examination. P/NP grading.

101. Advanced Problem Solving. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 100 or significant experience with mathematical competitions. Enrollment based on one selection test or past Putnam results. Advanced problem solving techniques and mathematical topics useful as preparation for Putnam competition. Problems in abstract algebra, linear algebra, number theory, combinatorics, probability, real and complex analysis, differential, equations, Fourier analysis. Regular practice tests given, similar in difficulty to Putnam competition. May be repeated for maximum of 12 units. P/NP or letter grading.

103A-103B-103C. Observation and Participation: Mathematics Instruction. (2-2-2) Seminar, one hour; fieldwork (classroom observation and participation), two hours. Requisites: courses 31A, 31B, 32A, 33A, 33B. Course 103A is enforced requisite to 103B, which is enforced requisite to 103C. Observation, participation, or tutoring in mathematics classes at middle school and secondary levels. May be repeated for credit. P/NP (undergraduates) or S/U (graduates) grading.

105A. Mathematics and Pedagogy for Teaching Secondary School Mathematics. (4) Lecture, four hours; fieldwork, 30 minutes. Requisites: courses 110A (or 117), 120A (or 123), and 131A, with grades of C− or better. Course 105A is requisite to 105B, which is requisite to 105C. Mathematical knowledge and research-based pedagogy needed for teaching key geometry topics in secondary school, including axiomatic systems, measure, and geometric transformations. Introduction to professional standards and current research for teaching secondary school mathematics. Letter grading.

105B. Mathematics and Pedagogy for Teaching Secondary School Mathematics. (4) Lecture, four hours; fieldwork, 30 minutes. Requisites: courses 105A, 110A (or 117), 120A (or 123), and 131A, with grades of C− or better. Mathematical knowledge and research-based pedagogy needed for teaching key polynomial, rational, and transcendental functions and related equations in secondary school; professional standards and current research for teaching secondary school mathematics. Letter grading.

105C. Mathematics and Pedagogy for Teaching Secondary School Mathematics. (4) Lecture, four hours; fieldwork, 30 minutes. Requisites: courses 105A, 105B, 110A (or 117), 120A (or 123), and 131A, with grades of C− or better. Mathematical knowledge and research-based pedagogy needed for teaching key analysis, probability, and statistics topics in secondary school; professional standards and current research for teaching secondary school mathematics. Letter grading.

106. History of Mathematics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 31A, 31B, 32A. Roots of modern mathematics in ancient Babylonia and Greece, including place value number systems and proof. Development of algebra through Middle Ages to Fermat and Abel, invention of analytic geometry and calculus. Selected topics. P/NP or letter grading.

Algebra, Number Theory, and Logic

110A-110B. Algebra. (4-4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. P/NP or letter grading. 110A. Requisite: course 115A. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 117. Ring of integers, integral domains, fields, polynomial domains, unique factorization. 110B. Requisite: course 110A or 117. Groups, structure of finite groups.

110AH-110BH. Algebra (Honors). (4-4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Honors sequence parallel to courses 110A, 110B.

110C. Algebra. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 110A, 110B. Field extensions, Galois theory, applications to geometric constructions, and solvability by radicals.

111. Theory of Numbers. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: courses 110A. Algebraic number theory (including prime ideal theory), cyclotomic fields and reciprocity laws, Diophantine equations (especially quadratic forms, elliptic curves), equations over finite fields, topics in theory of primes, including prime number theorem and Dirichlet’s theorem. P/NP or letter grading.

114C. Computability Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 110A or 131A or Philosophy 135. Effectively calculable, Turing computable, and recursive functions; Church/Turing thesis. Normal form theorem; universal functions; unsolvability and undecidability results. Recursive and recursively enumerable sets; relative recursiveness, polynomial-time computability. Arithmetical hierarchy. P/NP or letter grading.

114L. Mathematical Logic. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 110A or 131A or Philosophy 135. Introduction to mathematical logic, aiming primarily at completeness and incompleteness theorems of Gödel. Propositional and predicate logic; syntax and semantics; formal deduction; completeness, compactness, and Lowenheim/Skolem theorems. Formal number theory: nonstandard models; Gödel incompleteness theorem. P/NP or letter grading.

M114S. Introduction to Set Theory. (4) (Same as Philosophy M134.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 110A or 131A or Philosophy 135. Axiomatic set theory as framework for mathematical concepts; relations and functions, numbers, cardinality, axiom of choice, transfinite numbers. P/NP or letter grading.

115A-115B. Linear Algebra. (5-4) P/NP or letter grading. 115A. Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Requisite: course 33A. Techniques of proof, abstract vector spaces, linear transformations, and matrices; determinants; inner product spaces; eigenvector theory. 115B. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 115A. Linear transformations, conjugate spaces, duality; theory of a single linear transformation, Jordan normal form; bilinear forms, quadratic forms; Euclidean and unitary spaces, symmetric skew and orthogonal linear transformations, polar decomposition.

115AH. Linear Algebra (Honors). (5) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Requisite: course 33A with grade of B or better. Honors course parallel to course 115A. P/NP or letter grading.

115AX-115BX. Workshops in Linear Algebra. (1-1) Discussion, one hour. Corequisite for course 115AX: course 115A; for 115BX: course 115B. Supplementary techniques and applications for solving problems in linear algebra. Limits of investigation set by individual instructor. P/NP grading.

115HX. Workshop in Linear Algebra (Honors). (1) Discussion, one hour. Corequisite: course 115AH. Honors course parallel to course 115AX. P/NP grading.

116. Mathematical Cryptology. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 115A. Not open for credit to students with credit for Program in Computing 130. Introduction to mathematical cryptology using methods of number theory, algebra, probability. Topics include symmetric and public-key cryptosystems, one-way functions, signatures, key exchange, groups, primes, pseudoprimes, primality tests, quadratic reciprocity, factoring, rho method, RSA, discrete logs. P/NP or letter grading.

117. Algebra for Applications. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 115A. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 110A. Integers, congruences; fields, applications of finite fields; polynomials; permutations, introduction to groups.

Geometry and Topology

120A-120B. Differential Geometry. (4-4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 32B, 33B, 115A, 131A. Course 120A is requisite to 120B. Curves in 3-space, Frenet formulas, surfaces in 3-space, normal curvature, Gaussian curvature, congruence of curves and surfaces, intrinsic geometry of surfaces, isometries, geodesics, Gauss/Bonnet theorem. P/NP or letter grading.

121. Introduction to Topology. (4) Requisite: course 131A. Metric and topological spaces, completeness, compactness, connectedness, functions, continuity, homeomorphisms, topological properties.

123. Foundations of Geometry. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 115A. Axioms and models, Euclidean geometry, Hilbert axioms, neutral (absolute) geometry, hyperbolic geometry, Poincaré model, independence of parallel postulate.

Analysis

131A-131B. Analysis. (4-4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. P/NP or letter grading. 131A. Requisites: courses 32B, 33B. Recommended: course 115A. Rigorous introduction to foundations of real analysis; real numbers, point set topology in Euclidean space, functions, continuity. 131B. Requisites: courses 33B, 115A, 131A. Derivatives, Riemann integral, sequences and series of functions, power series, Fourier series.

131AH-131BH. Analysis (Honors). (4-4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites for course 131AH: courses 32B and 33B, with grades of B or better. Recommended: course 115A. Honors sequence parallel to courses 131A, 131B. P/NP or letter grading.

131AX. Analysis Techniques. (1) Lecture, one hour. Requisite: course 33B. Corequisite: course 131A. Review of elementary techniques of mathematics and their applications to topics in analysis, such as geometric and algebraic constructions, least upper bound axiom, etc. P/NP grading.

131C. Topics in Analysis. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 131A, 131B. Advanced topics in analysis, such as Lebesgue integral, integration on manifolds, harmonic analysis. Content varies from year to year. May be repeated for credit by petition.

132. Complex Analysis for Applications. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 32B, 33B. Introduction to basic formulas and calculation procedures of complex analysis of one variable relevant to applications. Topics include Cauchy/Riemann equations, Cauchy integral formula, power series expansion, contour integrals, residue calculus.

132H. Complex Analysis (Honors). (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 32B, 33B, and 131A, with grades of B or better. Specifically designed for students who have strong commitment to pursue graduate studies in mathematics. Introduction to complex analysis, with more emphasis on proofs. Honors course parallel to course 132. P/NP or letter grading.

133. Introduction to Fourier Analysis. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 33A, 33B, 131A. Fourier series, Fourier transform in one and several variables, finite Fourier transform. Applications, in particular, to solving differential equations. Fourier inversion formula, Plancherel theorem, convergence of Fourier series, convolution. P/NP or letter grading.

134. Linear and Nonlinear Systems of Differential Equations. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 33B. Dynamical systems analysis of nonlinear systems of differential equations. One- and two- dimensional flows. Fixed points, limit cycles, and stability analysis. Bifurcations and normal forms. Elementary geometrical and topological results. Applications to problems in biology, chemistry, physics, and other fields. P/NP or letter grading.

135. Ordinary Differential Equations. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 33A, 33B. Selected topics in differential equations. Laplace transforms, existence and uniqueness theorems, Fourier series, separation of variable solutions to partial differential equations, Sturm/Liouville theory, calculus of variations, two-point boundary value problems, Green’s functions. P/NP or letter grading.

136. Partial Differential Equations. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 33A, 33B. Linear partial differential equations, boundary and initial value problems; wave equation, heat equation, and Laplace equation; separation of variables, eigenfunction expansions; selected topics, as method of characteristics for nonlinear equations.

Applied Mathematics

142. Mathematical Modeling. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 32B, 33B. Introduction to fundamental principles and spirit of applied mathematics. Emphasis on manner in which mathematical models are constructed for physical problems. Illustrations from many fields of endeavor, such as physical sciences, biology, economics, and traffic dynamics.

143. Analytic Mechanics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 32B, 33B. Foundations of Newtonian mechanics, kinematics and dynamics of a rigid body, variational principles and Lagrange equations; calculus of variations, variable mass; related topics in applied mathematics.

146. Methods of Applied Mathematics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 32B, 33B. Integral equations, Green’s function, and calculus of variations. Selected applications from control theory, optics, dynamical systems, and other engineering problems.

149. Mathematics of Computer Graphics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: course 115A, and Program in Computing 10A or equivalent knowledge of programming in either Pascal or C language. Study of homogeneous coordinates, projective transformations, interpolating and approximating curves, representation of surfaces, and other mathematical topics useful for computer graphics.

151A-151B. Applied Numerical Methods. (4-4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to numerical methods with emphasis on algorithms, analysis of algorithms, and computer implementation issues. Letter grading. 151A. Requisites: courses 32B, 33B, 115A, Program in Computing 10A or Computer Science 31. Solution of nonlinear equations. Numerical differentiation, integration, and interpolation. Direct methods for solving linear systems. 151B. Requisite: course 151A. Numerical solution of differential equations. Approximation theory, iterative solutions of linear equations, solution of nonlinear systems, two-point boundary value problems, optimization.

153. Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 151A, 151B. Introduction to first- and second-order linear partial differential equations. Finite difference and finite element solution of elliptic, hyperbolic, and parabolic equations. Method of lines and Rayleigh/Ritz procedures. Concepts of stability and accuracy. Letter grading.

155. Mathematical Imaging. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 32B, 33B, 115A, Program in Computing 10A or Computer Science 31. Imaging geometry. Image transforms. Enhancement, restoration, and segmentation. Descriptors. Morphology. P/NP or letter grading.

156. Machine Learning. (5) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, one hour. Requisites: courses 32B, 33B, 115A, Program in Computing 10A or Computer Science 31. Introductory course on mathematical models for pattern recognition and machine learning. Topics include parametric and nonparametric probability distributions, curse of dimensionality, correlation analysis and dimensionality reduction, and concepts of decision theory. Advanced machine learning and pattern recognition problems, including data classification and clustering, regression, kernel methods, artificial neural networks, hidden Markov models, and Markov random fields. Projects in MATLAB to be part of final project presented in class. P/NP or letter grading.

157. Software Techniques for Scientific Computation. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: course 151A, Program in Computing 10C. Software structures, concepts, and conventions that support object-oriented programming. Identification of class structure, problem partitioning, and abstraction. Design and implementation of computer applications requiring scientific computation, visualization, and GUI components. Interlanguage interfacing. P/NP or letter grading.

157X. Workshop in Software Techniques for Scientific Computation. (1) Discussion, one hour. Corequisite: course 157. Supplementary techniques and applications for solving problems in scientific computing. Limits of investigation set by individual instructor. P/NP grading.

164. Optimization. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 115A, 131A. Not open for credit to students with credit for former Electrical Engineering 136. Fundamentals of optimization. Linear programming: basic solutions, simplex method, duality theory. Unconstrained optimization, Newton method for minimization. Nonlinear programming, optimality conditions for constrained problems. Additional topics from linear and nonlinear programming. P/NP or letter grading.

167. Mathematical Game Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 115A. Quantitative modeling of strategic interaction. Topics include extensive and normal form games, background probability, lotteries, mixed strategies, pure and mixed Nash equilibria and refinements, bargaining; emphasis on economic examples. Optional topics include repeated games and evolutionary game theory. P/NP or letter grading.

168. Introduction to Networks. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 115A, 170A or Electrical and Computer Engineering 131A or Statistics 100A. Introduction to network science (including theory, computation, and applications), which can be used to study complex systems of interacting agents. Study of networks in technology, social, information, biological, and mathematics involving basic structural features of networks, generative models of networks, network summary statistics, centrality, random graphs, clustering, and dynamical processes on networks. Introduction to advance topics as time permits. P/NP or letter grading.

Probability

170A. Probability Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 32B, 33A. Not open to students with credit for Electrical Engineering 131A or Statistics 100A. Probability distributions, random variables and vectors, expectation. P/NP or letter grading.

170B. Probability Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 170A. Convergence in distribution, normal approximation, laws of large numbers, Poisson processes, random walks. P/NP or letter grading.

170E. Introduction to Probability and Statistics 1: Probability. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 31A, 31B. Introduction to probability theory. Topics include discrete (binomial, Poisson, etc.) and continuous (exponential, gamma, chi-square, normal) distributions, bivariate distributions, distributions of functions of random variables (including moment generating functions and central limit theorem). P/NP or letter grading.

170S. Introduction to Probability and Statistics 2: Statistics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 31A, 31B, 170E. Introduction to statistics. Topics include sampling, estimation and properties of estimators, and construction of confidence intervals and hypotheses testing. P/NP or letter grading.

171. Stochastic Processes. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 33A, 170A (or Statistics 100A). Discrete Markov chains, continuous-time Markov chains, renewal theory. P/NP or letter grading.

172B. Actuarial Models I. (4) Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 170A and 170B (or Statistics 100A and 100B), 175. Designed to prepare students for Society of Actuaries Models for Life Contingencies examination. Provides understanding of theoretical basis of certain actuarial models and application of those models to insurance, pensions, and other financial risks. Letter grading.

172C. Actuarial Models II. (4) Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisite: course 172B. Designed to prepare students for Society of Actuaries Models for Life Contingencies examination. Theoretical basis of certain actuarial models and application to insurance, pensions, and other financial risks. Letter grading.

173A. Casualty Loss Models I. (4) Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 170A and 170B (or Statistics 100A and 100B), 175. Designed to prepare students for Society of Actuaries Construction and Evaluation of Actuarial Models examination. Provides understanding of various casualty loss models. Coverage of steps involved in modeling process and how to carry out these steps in solving business problems. Letter grading.

173B. Casualty Loss Models II. (4) Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisite: course 173A. Designed to prepare students for Society of Actuaries Construction and Evaluation of Actuarial Models examination. Construction of parametric loss models and introduction to credibility theory that provides tools to utilize collected information, such as past loss information, to predict future outcomes. Use of simulation to model future events. Letter grading.

174E. Mathematics of Finance for Mathematics/Economics Students. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 33A, 170A (or Statistics 100A), Economics 11. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 174A, Economics 141, or Statistics C183/C283. Modeling, mathematics, and computation for financial securities. Price of risk. Random walk models for stocks and interest rates. No-arbitrage theory for pricing derivative securities; Black/Scholes theory. European and American options. Monte Carlo, trees, finite difference methods. P/NP or letter grading.

175. Introduction to Financial Mathematics. (4) (Formerly numbered 172A.) Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 32B, 33B. Designed to prepare students for Society of Actuaries Financial Mathematics examination. Provides understanding of fundamental concepts of financial mathematics and how those concepts are applied in calculating present and accumulated values from various streams of cash flows as basis for future use in reserving, valuation, pricing asset/liability management, investment income, capital budgeting, and valuing contingent cash flows. Letter grading.

177. Theory of Interest and Applications. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 32B. Types of interest, time value of money, annuities and similar contracts, loans, bonds, portfolios and general cash flows, rate of return, term structure of interest rates, duration, convexity and immunization, interest rate swaps, financial derivatives, forwards, futures, and options. Letter grading.

Discrete Mathematics

180. Graph Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 31A, 31B, 61. Strongly recommended preparation: course 115A. Designed for computer science and engineering students. Graphs and trees. Planarity, graph colorings. Set systems. Ramsey theory. Random graphs. Linear algebra methods. P/NP or letter grading.

182. Algorithms. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 3C or 32A. Not open for credit to students with credit for Computer Science 180. Graphs, greedy algorithms, divide and conquer algorithms, dynamic programming, network flow. Emphasis on designing efficient algorithms useful in diverse areas such as bioinformatics and allocation of resources. P/NP or letter grading.

184. Enumerative Combinatorics. (4) (Formerly numbered 180.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 31A, 31B, 61, 115A. Designed for mathematics and physics students. Permutations and combinations, counting principles, recurrence relations, and generating functions. Application to asymptotic and probabilistic enumeration. P/NP or letter grading.

Special Studies

189. Advanced Honors Seminars. (1) Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

189HC. Honors Contracts. (1) Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to upper-division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

190A-190O. Seminars: Current Literature. (1 each) Seminar, one hour. Designed for undergraduate students. Readings and presentations of papers in mathematical literature under supervision of staff member. One-hour presentation required. P/NP grading: 190A. History and Development of Mathematics. 190B. Number Theory. 190C. Algebra. 190D. Logic. 190E. Geometry. 190F. Topology. 190G. Analysis. 190H. Differential Equations. 190I. Functional Analysis. 190J. Applied Mathematics. 190K. Probability. 190L. Dynamical Systems. 190M. Mathematics. 190N. Combinatorics. 190O. Cryptography.

191. Variable Topics Research Seminars: Mathematics. (4) Seminar, three hours. Variable topics research course in mathematics that covers material not covered in regular mathematics upper-division curriculum. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated for credit with topic and/or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

191H. Honors Research Seminars: Mathematics. (4) Seminar, three hours. Participating seminar on advanced topics in mathematics. Content varies from year to year. May be repeated for credit by petition. P/NP or letter grading.

195. Community Internships in Mathematics Education. (4) Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Internship to be supervised by Center for Community Learning and Mathematics Department. Students meet on regular basis with instructor, provide periodic reports of their experience, have assigned readings on mathematics education, and complete final paper. May not be repeated and may not be applied toward major requirements. Individual contract with supervising faculty member required. P/NP grading.

197. Individual Studies in Mathematics. (2 to 4) Tutorial, three hours per week per unit. Limited to juniors/seniors. At discretion of chair and subject to availability of staff, individual intensive study of topics suitable for undergraduate course credit but not specifically offered as separate courses. Scheduled meetings to be arranged between faculty member and student. Assigned reading and tangible evidence of mastery of subject matter required. May be repeated for maximum of 12 units, but no more than one 197 or 199 course may be applied toward upper-division courses required for majors offered by Mathematics Department. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

199. Directed Research or Senior Project in Mathematics. (2 or 4) Tutorial, three hours per week per unit. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research under guidance of faculty mentor. Scheduled meetings to be arranged between faculty member and student. Culminating report required. May be repeated for maximum of 12 units, but no more than one 197 or 199 course may be applied toward upper-division courses required for majors offered by Mathematics Department. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.