Mathematics Graduate Courses

Teacher Preparation

201A-201B-201C. Topics in Algebra and Analysis. (4-4-4) Preparation: bachelor’s degree in mathematics. Designed for mathematics/education program students. Important ideas of algebra, geometry, and calculus leading effectively from elementary to modern mathematics. Approaches to number system, point sets, geometric interpretations of algebra and analysis, integration, differentiation, series and analytic functions. May not be applied toward MA degree requirements.

202A-202B. Mathematical Models and Applications. (4-4) Preparation: bachelor’s degree in mathematics. Designed for mathematics/education program students. Development of mathematical theories describing various empirical situations. Basic characterizing postulates; development of a logical structure of theorems. Modern topics such as operations research, linear programming, game theory, learning models, models in social and life sciences. May not be applied toward MA degree requirements.

203. Master’s Linear Algebra. (4) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Rigorous treatment of fundamental results of pure and applied linear algebra over fields. Applications to contemporary research. Preparation for linear algebra portion of UCLA Mathematics Basic Examination that is required of MA and PhD students. S/U or letter grading.

204. Master’s Analysis. (4) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Rigorous treatment of fundamental results of analysis. Applications to contemporary research. Preparation for analysis portion of UCLA Mathematics Basic Examination that is required of MA and PhD students. S/U or letter grading.

Number Theory

205A-205B-205C. Number Theory. (4-4-4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 210A, 246A. Algebraic number theory, including ideal theory, valuations, local fields, cyclotomic fields. Introduction to class-field theory, analytic number theory, L-functions and class number formulas, and modular forms. S/U or letter grading.

206A-206B. Combinatorial Theory. (4-4) Generating functions. Probabilistic methods. Polya theorem. Enumerative graph theory. Partition theory. Number theoretical applications. Structure of graphs, matching theory, duality theorems. Packings, pavings, coverings, statistical designs, difference sets, triple systems, finite planes. Configurations, polyhedra. Ramsey theory, finite and transfinite, and applications.

207A-207B-207C. Topics in Number Theory. (4-4-4) Lecture, three hours. Adelic analysis on GL(1) and GL(2), especially Tate thesis and Hecke theory, automorphic representations. Special values of L-functions and p-adic L-functions, arithmetic theory of modular forms, advanced topics in analytic number theory. Arithmetic geometry, especially of modular curves. S/U or letter grading.

M208A-M208B. Topics in Applied Number Theory. (4-4) (Same as Computer Science M283A-M283B.) Lecture, three hours. Basic number theory, including congruences and prime numbers. Cryptography: public-key and discrete log cryptosystems. Attacks on cryptosystems. Primality testing and factorization methods. Elliptic curve methods. Topics from coding theory: Hamming codes, cyclic codes, Gilbert/Varshamov bounds, Shannon theorem. S/U or letter grading.

M209A. Cryptography. (4) (Same as Computer Science M282A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Introduction to theory of cryptography, stressing rigorous definitions and proofs of security. Topics include notions of hardness, one-way functions, hard-core bits, pseudorandom generators, pseudorandom functions and pseudorandom permutations, semantic security, public-key and private-key encryption, secret-sharing, message authentication, digital signatures, interactive proofs, zero-knowledge proofs, collision-resistant hash functions, commitment protocols, key-agreement, contract signing, and two-party secure computation with static security. Letter grading.

M209B. Cryptographic Protocols. (4) (Same as Computer Science M282B.) Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course M209A. Consideration of advanced cryptographic protocol design and analysis. Topics include noninteractive zero-knowledge proofs; zero-knowledge arguments; concurrent and non-black-box zero-knowledge; IP=PSPACE proof, stronger notions of security for public-key encryption, including chosen-ciphertext security; secure multiparty computation; dealing with dynamic adversary; nonmalleability and composability of secure protocols; software protection; threshold cryptography; identity-based cryptography; private information retrieval; protection against man-in-middle attacks; voting protocols; identification protocols; digital cash schemes; lower bounds on use of cryptographic primitives, software obfuscation. May be repeated for credit with topic change. Letter grading.

Algebra

210A-210B-210C. Algebra. (4-4-4) Requisites: courses 110A, 110B, 110C. Students with credit for courses 110B and/or 110C cannot receive MA degree credit for courses 210B and/or 210C. Group theory, including theorems of Sylow and Jordan/Holder/Schreier; rings and ideals, factorization theory in integral domains, modules over principal ideal rings, Galois theory of fields, multilinear algebra, structure of algebras.

211. Structure of Rings. (4) Requisite: course 210A. Radical, irreducible modules and primitive rings, rings and algebras with minimum condition.

212A. Homological Algebra. (4) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 210A. Modules over rings, homomorphisms and tensor products of modules, functors and derived functors, homological dimension of rings and modules. S/U or letter grading.

212B. Homological Algebra. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 210A, 210B, 210C, 212A. Advanced topics in modern homological algebra, such as triangulated categories, differential graded algebras as dg-categories, tilting theory and applications of group cohomology to representation theory, stable categories and modular representation theory, and other current topics. S/U or letter grading.

213A-213B. Theory of Groups. (4-4) Requisite: course 210A. Topics include representation theory, transfer theory, infinite Abelian groups, free products and presentations of groups, solvable and nilpotent groups, classical groups, algebraic groups.

214A-214B. Introduction to Algebraic Geometry. (4-4) Requisite: course 210A. Basic definitions and first properties of algebraic varieties in affine and projective space: irreducibility, dimension, singular and smooth points. More advanced topics, such as sheaves and their cohomology, or introduction to theory of Riemann surfaces, as time permits.

215A-215B. Commutative Algebra. (4-4) Requisite: course 210A. Topics from commutative ring theory, including techniques of localization, prime ideal structure in commutative Noetherian rings, principal ideal theorem, Dedekind rings, modules, projective modules, Serre conjecture, regular local rings.

216A-216B-216C. Further Topics in Algebra. (4-4-4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 210A, 210B, 210C. Closer examination of areas of current research in algebra, including algebraic geometry and K-theory. Variable content may include Abelian varieties, invariant theory, Hodge theory, geometry over finite fields, K-theory, homotopical algebra, and derived algebraic geometry. May be repeated for credit by petition. S/U or letter grading.

M217. Geometry and Physics. (4) (Same as Physics M236.) Lecture, three hours. Interdisciplinary course on topics at interface between physics quantum fields and superstrings and mathematics of differential and algebraic geometry. Topics include supersymmetry, Seiberg/Witten theory, conformal field theory, Calabi/Yau manifolds, mirror symmetry and duality, integrable systems. S/U grading.

218A. Discrete Mathematics: Probabilistic Methods. (4) Lecture, three hours. Linearity of expectation, second movement method, local lemma, correlation inequalities, martingales, large deviation inequalities, Janson and Talagrand inequalities, and pseudo-randomness. S/U or letter grading.

218B. Discrete Mathematics: Algebraic Methods. (4) Lecture, three hours. Basic dimension arguments, spaces of polynomials and tensor product methods, eigenvalues of graphs and their application, combinatorial Nullstellensatz and Chevalley/Warning theorem. Counterexample to Borsuk conjecture, chromatic number of unit distance graph of Euclidean space, explicit constructions of Ramsey graphs, other topics. S/U or letter grading.

218C. Topics in Discrete Mathematics. (4) Lecture, three hours. Examination of variety of methods, approaches, and techniques that were developed in last 30 years in discrete mathematics. Topics may include extremal problems for graphs and set systems, Ramsey theory, additive number theory combinatorial geometry, topological methods in combinatorics, entropy and other tools from information theory, discrete harmonic analysis and its applications to combinatorics and theoretical computer science. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.

Logic and Foundations

220A-220B-220C. Mathematical Logic. (4-4-4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course M114S. Fundamental methods and results in mathematical logic, using mathematical methods to reason about existence or nonexistence of proofs and computations in many different settings. Topics include compactness theorem, saturation of models, completeness and incompleteness theorems of Gödel, Turing computability and degrees of unsolvability, recursion in Baire space, Zermelo/Fraenkel axioms, universe of constructible sets, and related equiconsistency results in set theory. S/U or letter grading.

222A-222B. Lattice Theory and Algebraic Systems. (4-4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 210A. Partially ordered sets, lattices, distributivity, modularity; completeness, interaction with combinatorics, topology, and logic; algebraic systems, congruence lattices, subdirect decomposition, congruence laws, equational bases, applications to lattices.

223C. Topics in Computability Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 220A, 220B. Degrees of unsolvability, recursively enumerable sets, undecidable theories; inductive definitions, admissible sets and ordinals; recursion in higher types; recursion and complexity. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.

223D. Topics in Descriptive Set Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 220A, 220B. Classical and effective results on Borel and projective sets; infinite games of perfect information and principle of determinacy; consequences of determinacy, including periodicity, structure theory of pointclasses, and partition properties. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.

223M. Topics in Model Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 220A, 220B. Ultraproducts, preservation theorems, interpolation theorems, saturated models, omitting types, categoricity, two cardinal theorems, enriched languages, soft model theory, and applied model theory. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.

223S. Topics in Set Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 220A, 220B, 220C. Forcing and independence results, including independence of continuum hypothesis and independence of axion of choice; inner model theory; large cardinals; proofs of determinacy; combinatorial set theory. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.

Geometry and Topology

225A. Differential Topology. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Manifolds, tangent vectors, smooth maps, tangent bundles and vector bundles in general, vector fields and integral curves, Sard theorem on measure of critical values, embedding theorem, transversality, degree theory, Lefshetz fixed-point theorem, Euler characteristic, Ehresmann theorem that proper submersions are locally trivial fibrations. S/U or letter grading.

225B. Differential Geometry. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Lie derivatives, integrable distributions and Frobenius theorem, differential forms, integration and Stokes theorem, de Rham cohomology, including Mayer/Vietoris sequence, Poincaré duality, Thom classes, degree theory and Euler characteristic revisited from viewpoint of de Rham cohomology, Riemannian metrics, gradients, volume forms, and interpretation of classical integral theorems as aspects of Stokes theorem for differential forms. S/U or letter grading.

225C. Algebraic Topology. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Basic concepts of homotopy theory, fundamental group and covering spaces, singular homology and cohomology theory, axions of homology theory, Mayer/Vietoris sequence, calculation of homology and cohomology of standard spaces, cell complexes and cellular homology, de Rham theorem on isomorphism of de Rham differential-form cohomology and singular cohomology with real coefficients. S/U or letter grading.

226A-226B-226C. Differential Geometry. (4-4-4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 225A. Manifold theory; connections, curvature, torsion, and parallelism. Riemannian manifolds; completeness, submanifolds, constant curvature. Geodesics; conjugate points, variational methods, Myers theorem, nonpositive curvature. Further topics such as pinched manifolds, integral geometry, Kahler manifolds, symmetric spaces.

227A-227B. Algebraic Topology. (4-4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 225B. CW complexes, fiber bundles, homotopy theory, cohomology theory, spectral sequences.

229A-229B-229C. Lie Groups and Lie Algebras. (4-4-4) Preparation: knowledge of basic theory of topological groups and differentiable manifolds. Lie groups, Lie algebras, subgroups, subalgebras. Exponential map. Universal enveloping algebra. Campbell/Hausdorff formula. Nilpotent and solvable Lie algebras. Cohomology of Lie algebras. Theorems of Weyl, Levi-Mal’scev. Semi-simple Lie algebras. Classification of simple Lie algebras. Representations. Compact groups. Weyl character formula.

233. Partial Differential Equations on Manifolds. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 226A, 251A. Topics may include Laplacian operator on a Riemannian manifold, eigenvalues, Atiyah/Singer index theorem, isoperimetric inequalities, elliptic estimates, harmonic functions, function theory on manifolds, Green’s function, heat equation, minimal hypersurfaces, prescribed curvature equations, harmonic maps, Yang/Mills equation, Monge/Ampere equations.

234. Topics in Differential Geometry. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 226A, 226B. Complex and Kahler geometry, Hodge theory, homogeneous manifolds and symmetric spaces, finiteness and convergence theorems for Riemannian manifolds, almost flat manifolds, closed geodesics, manifolds of positive scalar curvature, manifolds of constant curvature. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit by petition.

235. Topics in Manifold Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 225A, 225B. Emphasis on low-dimensional manifolds. Structure and classification of manifolds, automorphisms of manifolds, submanifolds (e.g., knots and links). Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit by petition.

236. Topics in Geometric Topology. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 225A, 225B. Decomposition spaces, surgery theory, group actions, dimension theory, infinite dimensional topology. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit by petition.

237. Topics in Algebraic Topology. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 227A, 227B. Fixed-point theory, fiber spaces and classifying spaces, characteristic classes, generalized homology and cohomology theories. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit by petition.

238A-238B. Dynamical Systems. (4-4) Lecture, three hours. Recommended preparation: first-year analysis courses. Topics include qualitative theory of differential equations, bifurcation theory, and Hamiltonian systems; differential dynamics, including hyperbolic theory and quasiperiodic dynamics; ergodic theory; low-dimensional dynamics. S/U or letter grading.

Analysis and Differential Equations

240. Methods of Set Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 110A, 110B, 121, 131A, 131B. Naive, axiomatic set theory, axiom of choice and its equivalents, well-orderings, transfinite induction, ordinal and cardinal arithmetic. Applications to algebra: Hamel bases, Stone representation theorem. Applications to analysis and topology: Cantor/Bendixson theorem, counterexamples in measure theory, Borel and analytic sets, Choquet theorem.

245A-245B-245C. Real Analysis. (4-4-4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 121, 131A, 131B. Basic measure theory. Measure theory on locally compact spaces. Fubini theorem. Elementary aspects of Banach and Hilbert spaces and linear operators. Function spaces. Radon/Nikodym theorem. Fourier transform and Plancherel on R n and T n .

246A-246B-246C. Complex Analysis. (4-4-4) Requisites: courses 131A, 131B. Students with credit for course 132 cannot receive MA degree credit for course 246A. Cauchy/Riemann equations. Cauchy theorem. Cauchy integral formula and residue calculus. Power series. Normal families. Harmonic functions. Linear fractional transformations. Conformal mappings. Analytic continuation. Examples of Riemann surfaces. Infinite products. Partial fractions. Classical transcendental functions. Elliptic functions.

247A-247B. Classical Fourier Analysis. (4-4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 245A, 245B, 246A. Distribution on R n and T n . Principal values; other examples. Distributions with submanifolds as supports. Kernel theorem. Convolution; examples of singular integrals. Tempered distributions and Fourier transform theory on R n . Distributions with compact or one-sided supports and their complex Fourier transforms.

250A. Ordinary Differential Equations. (4) Requisite: course 246A. Basic theory of ordinary differential equations. Existence and uniqueness of solutions. Continuity with respect to initial conditions and parameters. Linear systems and nth order equations. Analytic systems with isolated singularities. Self-adjoint boundary value problems on finite intervals.

250B. Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equations. (4) Requisite: course 250A. Asymptotic behavior of nonlinear systems. Stability. Existence of periodic solutions. Perturbation theory of two-dimensional real autonomous systems. Poincaré/Bendixson theory.

250C. Advanced Topics in Ordinary Differential Equations. (4) Requisites: courses 250A, 250B. Selected topics, such as spectral theory or ordinary differential operators, nonlinear boundary value problems, celestial mechanics, approximation of solutions, and Volterra equations.

251A. Introductory Partial Differential Equations. (4) Classical theory of heat, wave, and potential equations; fundamental solutions, characteristics and Huygens principle, properties of harmonic functions. Classification of second-order differential operators. Maximum principles, energy methods, uniqueness theorems. Additional topics as time permits.

251B-251C. Topics in Partial Differential Equations. (4-4) In-depth introduction to topics of current interest in partial differential equations or their applications.

252A-252B. Topics in Complex Analysis. (4-4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 245A, 245B, 245C, 246A, 246B, 246C. Potential theory, subharmonic functions, harmonic measure; Hardy spaces; entire functions; univalent functions; Riemann surfaces; extremal length, variational methods, quasi-conformal mappings. Topics vary from year to year. S/U or letter grading.

253A-253B. Several Complex Variables. (4-4) Requisites: courses 245A, 245B, 245C, 246A, 246B, 246C. Introduction to analytic functions of several complex variables. The d-bar problem, Cousin problems, domains of holomorphy, complex manifolds.

254A-254B. Topics in Real Analysis. (4-4) Requisites: courses 245A, 245B, 245C, 246A, 246B, 246C. Selected topics in analysis and its applications to geometry and differential equations. Topics may vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit by petition.

Functional Analysis

255A. Functional Analysis. (4) Requisites: courses 245A and 245B, or 265A and 265B, and 246A. Banach spaces, basic principles. Weak topologies. Compact operators. Fredholm operators. Special spaces including Hilbert spaces and C(X).

255B-255C. Topics in Functional Analysis. (4-4) Requisite: course 255A. Topics include Banach algebras, operators on Banach spaces and Hilbert space, semigroups of operators, linear topological vector spaces, and other related areas.

256A-256B. Topological Groups and Their Representations. (4-4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 255A. Topological groups and their basic properties. Haar measure. Compact groups and their representations. Duality and Fourier analysis on locally compact abelian groups. Induced representations, Frobenius reciprocity. Representations of special groups (Lorentz, Galilean, etc.). Projective representations. Representations of totally disconnected groups. S/U or letter grading.

259A-259B. Operator Algebras in Hilbert Space. (4-4) Requisites: courses 255A, 255B, 255C. Selected topics from theories of C* and von Neumann algebras. Applications.

Applied Mathematics

260. Introduction to Applied Mathematics. (4) Requisite: course 142. Construction, analysis, and interpretation of mathematical models of problems which arise outside of mathematics.

261. Game Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours. Designed for graduate mathematics students. Bargaining theory, core, value, other solution concepts. Applications to oligopoly, general exchange and production economies, and allocation of joint costs. S/U or letter grading.

264. Applied Complex Analysis. (4) Requisite: course 246A. Topics include contour integration conformal mapping, differential equations in complex plane, special functions, asymptotic series, Fourier and Laplace transforms, singular integral equations.

265A-265B. Real Analysis for Applications. (4-4) Requisites: courses 131A, 131B. Not open for credit to students with credit for courses 245A, 245B, 245C. Lebesgue measure and integration on real line, absolutely continuous functions, functions of bounded variation, L 2- and L p- spaces. Fourier series. General measure and integrations, Fubini and Radon/Nikodym theorems, representation of functionals, Fourier integrals.

266A. Applied Ordinary Differential Equations. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 131A, 131B, 132, and 134 and 135, or 146. Spectral theory of regular boundary value problems and examples of singular Sturm/Liouville problems, related integral equations, phase/plane analysis of nonlinear equations. S/U or letter grading.

266B-266C. Applied Partial Differential Equations. (4-4) Requisite: course 266A. Classification of equations, classical potential theory, Dirichlet and Neumann problems. Green’s functions, spectral theory of Laplace equation in bounded domains, first-order equations, wave equations, Cauchy problem, energy conservation, heat equation, fundamental solution, equations of fluid mechanics and magnetohydrodynamics.

266D-266E. Applied Differential Equations. (4-4) Requisites: courses 266A, 266B, 266C. Advanced topics in linear and nonlinear partial differential equations, with emphasis on energy estimates, numerical methods, and applications to fluid mechanics. Additional topics include dispersive waves, systems with multiple time scales, and applications to fluid mechanics.

M268A. Functional Analysis for Applied Mathematics and Engineering. (4) (Same as Electrical and Computer Engineering M208B.) Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 115A and 115B (or Electrical and Computer Engineering 208A), 131A, 131B, 132. Topics may include L^{p} spaces, Hilbert, Banach, and separable spaces; Fourier transforms; linear functionals. Riesz representation theory, linear operators and their adjoints; self-adjoint and compact operators. Spectral theory. Differential operators such as Laplacian and eigenvalue problems. Resolvent distributions and Green’s functions. Semigroups. Applications. S/U or letter grading.

M268B. Topics in Functional Analysis for Applied Mathematics and Engineering. (4) (Same as Electrical Engineering M208C.) Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course M268A. Semigroups of linear operators over Hilbert spaces; generator and resolvent, generation theorems, Laplace inversion formula. Dissipative operators and contraction semigroups. Analytic semigroups and spectral representation. Semigroups with compact resolvents. Parabolic and hyperbolic systems. Controllability and stabilizability. Spectral theory of differential operators, PDEs, generalized functions. S/U or letter grading.

268C. Topics in Applied Functional Analysis. (4) Requisite: course 255A. Topics include spectral theory with applications to ordinary differential operators, eigenvalue problems for differential equations, generalized functions, and partial differential equations. S/U or letter grading.

269A-269B-269C. Advanced Numerical Analysis. (4-4-4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 115A, 151A, 151B. Numerical solution for systems of ordinary differential equations; initial and boundary value problems. Numerical solution for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations. Topics in computational linear algebra. S/U or letter grading.

270A-270F. Mathematical Aspects of Scientific Computing. (4 each) Lecture, three hours. S/U or letter grading:

270A. Techniques of Scientific Computing. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 115A, 151A, 151B, Program in Computing 10A. Mathematical modeling for computer applications, scientific programming languages, software development, graphics, implementation of numerical algorithms on different architectures, case studies. S/U or letter grading.

270B-270C. Computational Linear Algebra. (4-4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 115A, 151A, 151B, Program in Computing 10A. Direct, fast, and iterative algorithms, overdetermined systems; singular value decomposition, regularization, sparse systems, algebraic eigenvalue problem. S/U or letter grading.

270D-270E. Computational Fluid Dynamics. (4-4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 115A, 151A, 151B, Program in Computing 10A. Basic equations, finite difference, finite element, pseudo-spectral, and vortex methods; stability, accuracy, shock capturing, and boundary approximations. S/U or letter grading.

270F. Parallel Numerical Algorithms. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 115A, 151A, 151B, 270B, 270C, Program in Computing 10A. Recommended: courses 270A, 270D, 270E. Design, analysis, and implementation of numerical algorithms on modern vector and parallel computers. Discussion of classical numerical algorithms and novel parallel algorithms. Emphasis on applications to PDEs. S/U or letter grading.

271A. Tensor Analysis. (4) Requisite: course 131A. Algebra and calculus of tensors on n-dimensional manifolds. Curvilinear coordinates and coordinate-free methods. Covariant differentiation. Green/Stokes theorem for differential forms. Applications to topics such as continuum and particle mechanics.

271B. Analytical Mechanics. (4) Preparation: prior knowledge of mechanics. Requisite: course 271A. Newtonian and Lagrangian equations. Hamilton principle. Principle of least action. Holonomic and nonholonomic systems. Hamilton canonical equations, contact transformations, applications.

271C. Introduction to Relativity. (4) Preparation: prior knowledge of mechanics. Requisite: course 271A. Restricted theory of relativity. Extensions to general theory. Relativistic theory of gravitation.

271D. Wave Mechanics. (4) General concepts of mechanical systems (states, space-time, “logics,” etc.). Classical and quantum examples. Correspondence principle. Spinors.

272A. Foundations of Continuum Mechanics. (4) Lecture, three hours. Kinematic preliminaries, conservation laws for mass, momentum and energy, entropy production, constitutive laws. Linear elasticity, inviscid fluid, viscous fluid. Basic theorems of fluid mechanics. Simple solutions. Low Reynolds number flow, Stokes drag. High Reynolds number flow, boundary layers. Two-dimensional potential flow, simple aerofoil. Compressible flow, shocks.

272B. Mathematical Aspects of Fluid Mechanics. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 272A. Review of basic theory of moving continua, fluid equations, integral theorems. Simple solutions, flow created by slowly moving bodies, flows where viscosity is negligible, vortices, boundary layers and their separation, water waves, ship waves, compressional waves, shock waves, turbulence theory (overview).

272C. Magnetohydrodynamics. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 272A. Basic electromagnetism. Steady flows, Hartmann layers. Alfvén theorem and waves. Compressible media. Magnetostatic equilibria and stability.

272D. Rotating Fluids and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics. (4) Lecture, three hours. Effects of Coriolis forces on fluid behavior. Inviscid flows, Taylor/Proudman theorem, Taylor columns, motions of bodies, inertial waves in spheres and spherical shells, Rossby waves. Ekman layers, spin-up. Shallow-water theory, wind-driven ocean circulation. Effects of stratification, Benard convection. Baroclinic instability, Eady model. S/U or letter grading.

273A. Optimization and Calculus of Variations: Basic Optimization Theory. (4) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to basic optimization theory, recognition of solutions, and geometry of optimization. Some convex analysis, separation hyperplane, and duality theory. Basic optimization algorithms and their rates of convergence. S/U or letter grading.

273B. Optimization and Calculus of Variations: Variations Calculus. (4) Lecture, three hours. Abstract convex analysis and variational problems. Convexity, differentiability, existence, and characterization of minimizers. Polar functions, Lagrangians, saddle points, and duality techniques. Application of abstract mathematical theory to optimization problems of calculus of variations on Sobolev spaces. S/U or letter grading.

273C. Optimization and Calculus of Variations: Numerical Optimization. (4) Lecture, three hours. Derivation, analysis, and implementation of numerical methods for constrained and unconstrained optimization problems of variety of types and with data at different scales. S/U or letter grading.

274A. Asymptotic Methods. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 132. Fundamental mathematics of asymptotic analysis, asymptotic expansions of Fourier integrals, method of stationary phase. Watson lemma, method of steepest descent, uniform asymptotic expansions, elementary perturbation problems. S/U or letter grading.

274B-274C. Perturbation Methods. (4-4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 266A. Boundary layer theory, matched asymptotic expansions, WKB theory. Problems with several time scales: Poincaré method, averaging techniques, multiple-scale analysis. Application to eigenvalue problems, nonlinear oscillations, wave propagation, and bifurcation problems. Examples from various fields of science and engineering.

Probability and Statistics

275A-275B. Probability Theory. (4-4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Connection between probability theory and real analysis. Weak and strong laws of large numbers, central limit theorem, conditioning, ergodic theory, martingale theory. S/U or letter grading.

275C. Stochastic Processes. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 275B. Brownian motion, continuous-time martingales, Markov processes, potential theory. S/U or letter grading.

275D. Stochastic Calculus. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 275C. Stochastic integration, stochastic differential equations, Ito formula and its applications. S/U or letter grading.

275E. Stochastic Particle Systems. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 275C. Interacting particle systems, including contact process, stochastic Ising model, and exclusion processes; percolation theory. S/U or letter grading.

276. Topics in Network Science. (4) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 115A, 170A. Interesting and popular areas of network science. Topics vary from year to year and may include dynamical processes on networks, mesoscale structures in networks, time-dependent networks, multilayer networks, applications of networks, data analysis in networks, spatial networks, and others. Discussion of recent review articles and research papers. Some presentations by students. Joint project on topic in network science possibly leading to publication. S/U or letter grading.

Special Studies

285A-285N. Seminars. (4 each) Seminar, three hours. No more than two 285 courses may be applied toward MA degree requirements except by prior consent of graduate vice chair. Topics in various branches of mathematics and their applications by means of lectures and informal conferences with staff members. S/U or letter grading: 285A. History and Development of Mathematics. 285B. Number Theory. 285C. Algebra. 285D. Logic. 285E. Geometry. 285F. Topology. 285G. Analysis. 285H. Differential Equations. 285I. Functional Analysis. 285J. Applied Mathematics. 285K. Probability. 285L. Dynamical Systems. 285N. Combinatorics. 285P. Representation Theory.

290A-290O. Participating Seminars: Current Literature. (4 each) Seminar, three hours. Designed for PhD students. Readings and presentations of papers in mathematical literature under supervision of staff member. Two-hour presentation required. S/U grading: 290A. History and Development of Mathematics. 290B. Number Theory. 290C. Algebra. 290D. Logic. 290E. Geometry. 290F. Topology. 290G. Analysis. 290H. Differential Equations. 290I. Functional Analysis. 290J. Applied Mathematics. 290K. Probability. 290L. Dynamical Systems. 290M. Mathematics. 290N. Combinatorics. 290O. Cryptography./p>

296A-296N. Research Seminars. (1 each) Seminar, two hours. Seminars and discussion by staff and students. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading: 296A. History and Development of Mathematics. 296B. Number Theory. 296C. Algebra. 296D. Logic. 296E. Geometry. 296F. Topology. 296G. Analysis. 296H. Differential Equations. 296I. Functional Analysis. 296J. Applied Mathematics. 296K. Probability. 296L. Dynamical Systems. 296M. Mathematics. 296N. Combinatorics.

370A-370B. Teaching of Mathematics. (4-4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 33B. Limited to senior Mathematics Department majors. Course 370A is requisite to 370B. Topics in geometry, algebra, number theory, discrete mathematics, and functions presented from a problem-solving and student participation point of view, with emphasis on historical context and appropriate role of proof. S/U or letter grading.

375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum. (1 to 4) Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

495. Teaching College Mathematics. (2) Seminar, one hour; two-day intensive training at beginning of Fall Quarter. Required of all new teaching assistants and new PhD students. Special course for teaching assistants designed to deal with problems and techniques of teaching college mathematics. S/U grading.

495B. Technology and Teaching. (2 to 4) Seminar, two hours; laboratory, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 495. Focus on undergraduate mathematics instruction. Web-based electronic communication, using technology for class organization, use of presentation software packages, and creation of electronic teaching portfolio. Provides mechanics of technology and forum for evaluation and comparison of technology in undergraduate mathematics teaching. S/U grading.

501. Cooperative Program. (2 to 8) Preparation: consent of UCLA department chair and graduate dean, and host campus instructor, department chair, and graduate dean. Used to record enrollment of UCLA students in courses taken under cooperative arrangements with USC. S/U grading.

596. Directed Individual Study or Research. (2 to 8) Tutorial, to be arranged. Supervised individual reading and study on project approved by a faculty member, which may be preparation for MA examination. May be repeated for credit, but only two 596 courses (8 units) may be applied toward MA degree unless departmental consent is obtained. S/U or letter grading.

599. Research in Mathematics. (2 to 12) Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation: advancement to PhD candidacy. Study and research for PhD dissertation. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.