Film and Television BA

Capstone Major

The Film and Television major is a designated capstone major. Undergraduate students are required to complete one departmentally sponsored internship course as well as coursework related to the senior thesis concentration area. All courses, including capstone senior thesis projects, involve work shopping individual projects. Group participation in the creation and production of each student’s project is core to the curriculum. Specific student learning objectives vary based on concentration area.

The undergraduate Film and Television major encourages development of a personal vision that incorporates creative, practical, intellectual, and aesthetic values. Within the context of a liberal arts education, the program provides a broad background in the field and in the diversity of film and television practice, including courses in history and theory, critical thinking, animation, screenwriting, and the fundamentals of film, video, and television production.

Learning Outcomes

The Film and Television major has the following learning outcomes:

  • Production of scholarly and artistic work in the areas of history, criticism, and theory of film, television, and digital media
  • Mastery of fundamentals of preproduction, production, and postproduction of film, television, and digital media
  • Demonstrated advanced understanding of one or more areas of study in cinema and media studies, filmmaking, screenwriting, animation, digital media, and producing

Admission

Students are admitted for fall quarter only. Admission is highly competitive, and only a limited number of students can be accepted each year. In addition to the UC Application for Admission and Scholarships, freshman and transfer applicants must submit a School of Theater, Film, and Television supplemental application. For information about the supplemental application, see the major website.

Transfer Students

Transfer applicants to the Film and Television major with 90 or more units must meet UCLA transfer requirements and, before arriving at UCLA, must complete the School of Theater, Film, and Television general education requirements by either (1) taking college courses that satisfy the school general education requirements or (2) completing the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) at a California community college or (3) achieving UC reciprocity through completion of general education requirements at another UC campus while a student there.

In addition to the UC Application for Admission and Scholarships, transfer applicants must submit a School of Theater, Film, and Television supplemental application. For information about the supplemental application, see the major website.

Refer to the UCLA transfer admission guide for up-to-date information regarding transfer selection for admission.

Preparation for the Major

Required: Film and Television 4, 6A, 10A, 33, 51, 84A, and one course from Theater 10, 15, 20, 28A, 28B, 28C, or 30.

The Major

Required: Film and Television 101A, 106B or 106C, 134, 150, 154, 155, 163; one cinema and media studies elective from 107, 108, 109, M111, 112, 113, 114, M117, or 122N; one capstone departmentally sponsored internship (course 195) taken concurrently with course 194; and a senior concentration (20 units) of advanced film coursework selected from among any one or more of the following areas of study, including at least two courses from within one area:

Cinema and Media Studies: Film and Television 106B or 106C, 108, 109, 112, 113, 114, 128.

Production: Film and Television C118, 122D, C152C, 153, C154B, C157, C158, 175A, 175B, C186A, C186B, C186C.

Screenwriting: Film and Television 135A, 135B, 135C.

Producing: Film and Television 146, C147, 183A, 183B, 183C, 184B.

Animation: Film and Television C181A, C181B, C181C.

Digital Media: Film and Television C142, C144, C145, C148.

Courses taken to satisfy the senior concentration may not also be applied toward other course requirements in the major.

Students should be mindful of the exigencies inherent in filmmaking and be prepared to meet the additional demands of time and costs.

Students are required to perform assignments on each other’s projects. In addition, the department reserves the right to hold for its own purposes examples of any work done in classes and to retain for distribution such examples as may be selected.